EN: too - placement when it means "also"

Stéphane89

Senior Member
French (BE)
Helle everyone,

I'm sure this question has already been asked, but I could find any topic about it back, so I'm opening a new thread...

I would like to know the difference between these sentence:

I, too, like horses.
I like horses too.


Which one is the same as "I also like horses", and what does the other mean...

Thank you very much in advance!

Moderator note: Multiple threads merged to create this one.
 
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  • marget

    Senior Member
    I think they can both mean "I also like horses". The first one puts the emphasis on "I", meaning in addition to someone else previously mentioned, but I feel that the second one can mean both "I, as well as someone else" and "horses, as well as other animals".
     
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    lrosa

    Senior Member
    English - Ireland
    I, too, like horses = Moi aussi, j'aime les chevaux

    I like horses too (stress on "I" and "too" in speech) = Moi aussi, j'aime les chevaux
    I like horses too = I like horses (in addition to something else that has already been mentioned)
    I like horses too = I like horses (in addition to watching them/riding them)

    I also like horses = Moi aussi, j'aime les chevaux
    I also like horses = I like horses (in addition to something else)
    I also like horses = I like horses (in addition to watching them/riding them)
     

    djamal 2008

    Senior Member
    arabic
    I like horses too. Too, here, is adverb of the verbe like. J'aime aussi.
    I, too, like horses. Means I with other or others like horses. Moi aussi, j'aime les cheveaux.
     

    lrosa

    Senior Member
    English - Ireland
    Actually, I think it all depends on the way you say it, i.e. which word you put the stress on. Therefore there can be three different meanings to "I like horses too". "I, too, like horses", however, is unambiguous :)
     

    Rizla

    Member
    English - British
    I, too, like horses.
    I like horses too.

    La première phrase ça va dire "Comme les autres, j'aime les chevaux."

    En général le deuxième ça va dire "J'aime aussi les chevaux", mais ce peut aussi avoir la même signification que la première phrase. Ça dépend du contexte.
     
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    Nico Las

    Member
    French
    He has a problem with it, too / He too has a problem with it

    Hi all,

    What would be the correct sentence ? Is there any rules at all ? Is the meaning different like in French : ' je ne pense pas lui avoir dit' / ' je pense ne pas lui avoir dit' ?

    Thanks :)
     
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    lucas-sp

    Senior Member
    English - Californian
    Par contre, je dirais que "he, too, ..." sonne forcément plus soutenu que "he ... , too." Donc, pour moi, l'utilisation de "he, too ..." ne peut pas coincider avec la phrase verbale "has got a problem with it" (qui me semble vraiment "casual").

    "He, too, has raised concerns" marche bien, parce que le niveau linguistique de "to raise concerns" n'est pas incompatible avec celui de "he, too."

    Et en revanche le mot "also" n'est pas assez soutenu que "too." J'accepte "He's got a problem with it also" comme "He's also got a problem with it." On peut insister sur "lui" en utilisant "He's also."
     

    JeanDeSponde

    Senior Member
    France, Français
    Maintenant, si je reprends la phrase proposée (He [too] has a problem with it [too]), cela correspond en français à deux animaux différents:
    • Lui aussi a un problème avec ça -> il n'est pas le seul à avoir un problème
    • Il a un problème avec ça aussi -> ce n'est pas son seul problème
    Je pense qu'il y a les mêmes cas en anglais : He has a Mercedes, too vs. he too, has a Mercedes
     

    Maître Capello

    Mod et ratures
    French – Switzerland
    He has a problem with it, too.
    He, too, has a problem with it.

    Je pense que selon le contexte, la première phrase en anglais peut également avoir le même sens que la seconde. Ce ne sont donc pas forcément des « animaux différents ».
     

    lucas-sp

    Senior Member
    English - Californian
    I would say that:

    He has a problem with it, too & He, too, has a problem with it = Il n'est pas le seul à avoir un problème
    He has a problem with it, too = Il fait beaucoup de choses, dont "having a problem"
    He has a problem with that, too = C
    e n'est pas son seul problème ("it" isn't forceful enough; you need the punch of a more stressed pronoun if you want the meaning of "with that thing as well")

    "Also" is different, and can mean a lot more things.
     

    Ashmada

    Senior Member
    French - Belgium
    1. I, too, like horses.
    2. I like horses too.
    1. Moi aussi, j'aime les chevaux. -> sous entendu comme toi/vous/lui/elle/eux.
    2. J'aime aussi les chevaux. -> sous entendu j'aime les chiens/les chats/les moustiques/le miel ET les chevaux.
     

    acbltd

    New Member
    English-US
    I, too, like horses = Moi aussi, j'aime les chevaux

    I like horses too (stress on "I" and "too" in speech) = Moi aussi, j'aime les chevaux
    I like horses too = I like horses (in addition to something else that has already been mentioned)
    I like horses too = I like horses (in addition to watching them/riding them)

    I also like horses = Moi aussi, j'aime les chevaux
    I also like horses = I like horses (in addition to something else)
    I also like horses = I like horses (in addition to watching them/riding them)

    C'est la meilleure réponse ici, et ça marche avec tous expressions avec un sujet et "too." "Too" est un adverbe, mais il peut agir comme un adjectif.
    I, too, like horses: ça veut agir comme un adjectif pour "I."
    I like horses too: c'est un adverbe pour "like."


    While "too" may never be formally considered an adjective, it can sometimes act as one as it does in the first sentence. The purpose of the sentence, "I, too, like horses," is to describe that in additional to the presumed previous speaker, the current speaker also likes horses. This also occurs in the expression, "This, too, shall pass," which implies that this will pass as has everything else. Back to our example, because the main object of "I, too, like horses," is to add I to the list of other likes of horses, too in this sentence is clarifying the position of I, a noun. Therefore too acts like an adjective because its reason for inclusion in the sentence is to modify or to clarify a noun.
     
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    lucas-sp

    Senior Member
    English - Californian
    "Too" peut être un adjectif ou un adverbe.
    Can you give a source for this claim? I have never seen "too" being considered as an adjective, in any grammar or dictionary. Of course, its force can apply to many different things in a sentence, including nouns, but its role is always adverbial.
     

    acbltd

    New Member
    English-US
    Too in the sentence "I, too, like horses," may be technically be an adverb, and it may technically be modifying the verb like. However, the reason for its inclusion in the sentence is to clarify the position of I in the sentence (if it was not describing that I was being added to the list of others who like horses, the too would not be necessary and the sentence would simply read, "I like horses." So, despite the technical definition, the spirit of too in this sentence is to clarify I, meaning its behavior is like that of an adjective.
     

    lucas-sp

    Senior Member
    English - Californian
    I agree that too is only an adverb, but adverbs don't modify nouns or pronouns, only verbs, adjectives or other adverbs.
    I didn't mean to say that it was modifying a noun. It's clearly modifying an entire sentence/expression/utterance/syntagm. What I was trying to get at was that the force of "too" - the extra emphasis brought to the expression by the adverb - can intend itself towards a noun or pronoun.
     
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