EN: You have nothing to do, have you?

Klioutch7

New Member
Français (France)
Hello everybody,
I was wondering which one of these two sentences is correct.
It deals with tags and I've got some difficulties with them...
Here there are:
You have nothing to do
, have you?
You have nothing to do, do you?

My teacher told me that the first proposition is the correct one but I have still doubts.
Thank you very much for your answers!
 
  • Klioutch7

    New Member
    Français (France)
    I don't understand because if you put the main proposition in negative, you use the auxiliary do: You don't have anything to do. You can't say: "You haven't anything to do", can you?
    Could you please explain to me?
     
    Last edited:

    Maître Capello

    Mod et ratures
    French – Switzerland
    I don't understand because if you put the main proposition in negative, you use the auxiliary do: You don't have anything to do. You can't say: "You haven't anything to do", can you?
    Si si! :)

    En fait, pour les question tags, il faut simplement reprendre le verbe principal, le cas échéant son auxiliaire, et passer du positif au négatif ou vice versa.

    You have nothing to do, have you?
    You haven't anything to do, have you?
    You don't have anything to do, do you?
    You have something to do, haven't you?
    You are doing something, aren't you?
     

    mark4celine

    Member
    Mexican Spanish
    When you're using question tags, you have to use the auxiliary verb, not the main verb, and this a rule, so your sentence must be like this:

    You have nothing to do, do you?

    And it's different from You have done nothing, have you?

    The auxiliary verb you gotta use in your sentence is DO/DOES 'cause it's a present simple tense, even if you've got HAVE TO.

    You just cannot use HAVE as the auxiliary verb.

    Saludos!
     

    Klioutch7

    New Member
    Français (France)
    J'ai toujours appris qu'il fallait reprendre l'auxiliaire et non simplement le verbe principal.
    Par exemple on doit dire:
    He plays football every Monday, doesn't he?
    Cependant dans la phrase:
    "You have nothing to do" l'auxiliaire est pour moi l'auxiliaire do car il porte la marque de la négation, on dira:
    "You don't have anything to do" et non "You haven't anything to do".
    C'est pourquoi, je voudrais qu'on m'explique pourquoi:
    You have nothing to do, do you?
    est incorrecte.Merci à vous!

    afbyord et mark4celine have two different points of view:
    afbyord thinks "You have nothing to do, have you?" is correct whereas mark4celine doesn't think so. In his opinion, "You have nothing to do, do you?" is the correct sentence.
    So who is right?
    Thanks
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    mark4celine

    Member
    Mexican Spanish
    Ce n'est pas incorrect!! La phrase incorrecte est: You have nothing to do, have you? :cross:

    Do you have anything to do? :tick:
    Yes, I do / I have something to do. :tick:
    No, I don't / I don't have anything to do / I have nothing to do. :tick:

    As we can see, we gotta use the auxiliary verb DO/DOES, so you canNOT use HAVE in the question tag. You have to use "do", don't you? :)

    Saludos!
     

    moustic

    Senior Member
    British English
    "You have nothing to do, do you?" is grammatically correct, but sounds a bit strange.

    Personally, I would say: "You haven't got anything to do, have you?"
    Problem avoided! ;-)
     

    Klioutch7

    New Member
    Français (France)
    I totally agree with you, mark4celine, and that's for this reason that I posted this topic.
    The fact that my teacher told me I was wrong surprised me because, to me, we have to use "do you?". I am happy we have the same piont of view. However, afbyorb who is American believes that "have you?" is better. SoI have doubts...

    Thank you very much moustic! You are my saviour! :)
    I was waiting for a British person to answer my question because "tags" are apparently more Bristish than American.
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    mark4celine

    Member
    Mexican Spanish
    You have nothing to do = you don't have anything to do

    So it's still present simple but with a different structure, right? That why I cannot understand why you can use HAVE. It's NOT a perfect tense. I could be wrong but grammatically it is correct.

    I've checked this topic and I've found that using "have" to express possession, it's possible to use both, do/does or have/has in tag questions. But if it's present perfect, you always have to use have/has.

    So... problem solved!! Both are correct but only in present simple tense!!

    I've learned/learnt something new, and this is what I like the most about this forum.

    Thanks to everybody.
     

    geostan

    Senior Member
    English Canada
    You have nothing to do, have you?
    You have nothing to do, do you?
    You haven't anything to do, have you?
    You haven't anything to do, do you?
    You don't have anything to do, do you?

    While picking up the original auxiliary is undoubtedly the correct way to deal with these tags, you will often hear the all-inclusive form do you, regardless of the auxiliary.
     

    Maître Capello

    Mod et ratures
    French – Switzerland
    When you're using question tags, you have to use the auxiliary verb, not the main verb
    J'ai toujours appris qu'il fallait reprendre l'auxiliaire et non simplement le verbe principal.
    Je me suis mal exprimé. Ce que je voulais dire, c'est qu'il faut utiliser l'auxiliaire s'il existe, mais que les verbes principaux qui sont déjà des modaux sont repris tels quels.

    You can do it, can't you?
    We should do it, shouldn't we?
    He did it, didn't he?
    She has (got) a car, hasn't she?
     

    Forero

    Senior Member
    Some questions are easy to tag:

    You have something to do, don't you?
    You do have something to do, don't you?
    You haven't anything to do, have you?
    You don't have anything to do, do you?

    But:

    You hardly have anything to do, ...?
    "Do you?" = "Do you hardly have anything to do?". :cross: (wrong because it asks the same thing that has just been stated).
    "Don't you?" = "Don't you hardly have anything to do?". :tick: (right because it asks the opposite of what has just been stated).

    You really do have nothing to do, ...?
    "Do you?" = "Do you really have nothing to do?". :cross: (wrong because it asks the same thing that has just been stated).
    "Don't you?" = "Don't you really have nothing to do?". :tick: (right because it asks the opposite of what has just been stated).

    You have nothing to do, ...?
    "Have you?" = "Have you nothing to do?" :cross: (wrong because it asks the same thing that has just been stated).
    "Haven't you?" = "Haven't you nothing to do?" ? (right but very strange).
    "Do you?" = "Do you have nothing to do?" :cross: (wrong because it asks the same thing that has just been stated).
    "Don't you?" = "Don't you have nothing to do?" ? (right but strange).

    I recommend starting with "You don't have anything to do" rather than "You have nothing to do."
     
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