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mimi2

Senior Member
vietnam vietnamese
Hi,
"Enabling to read and speak a language does not guarantee that misunderstanding will not take place."
Please tell me if “Enable” and “take place” are suitable words in this case?
Thanks.
 
  • mimi2

    Senior Member
    vietnam vietnamese
    Yes, bibliolept.
    But I am wondering why not enable? I think enable and be able to have the same meaning?
    Can I use "happen" in place of "take place"?
     

    Trisia

    Senior Member
    Romanian
    To enable someone to do something means you make them capable to do that thing. This software enables me to write replies to your posts. Thus I am able to answer your questions, to the best of my knowledge.

    Enabling someone to read usually means you teach them how to read. But it could also mean that you give them books - you give them the possibility to read. Or, if they're visually impaired, the Braille alphabet enables them to read.

    Just an opinion :D
     

    mimi2

    Senior Member
    vietnam vietnamese
    Hi, Trisia.
    So is it correct?
    Reading and speaking a language don't enable you to guarantee that misunderstanding will not take place.
     

    Trisia

    Senior Member
    Romanian
    The ability to read and speak a language doesn't enable you to guarantee that no misunderstandings will occur/take place... It's correct, I think, but you changed the meaning a bit, "enable" no longer refers to the capacity of reading&writing, it now refers to the possibility of saying that no misunderstandings will happen. Was that what you meant in the first place?
     

    mjscott

    Senior Member
    American English
    Hi, Trisia.
    So is it correct?
    Reading and speaking a language don't enable you to guarantee that misunderstanding will not take place.
    Reading and speaking a language don't enable you to guarantee that misunderstanding will not take place

    Usually two negatives make a positive. If reading and speaking a language don't enable you to guarantee that misunderstanding will not take place, then reading and speaking a language does enable you to guarantee that misunderstanding will take place. (I think in this case it doesn't hold true....)
     

    mimi2

    Senior Member
    vietnam vietnamese
    The ability to read and speak a language doesn't enable you to guarantee that no misunderstandings will occur/take place... It's correct, I think, but you changed the meaning a bit, "enable" no longer refers to the capacity of reading&writing, it now refers to the possibility of saying that no misunderstandings will happen. Was that what you meant in the first place?
    Trisia.
    I understand what you mean. Thank you very much. :)
     

    mimi2

    Senior Member
    vietnam vietnamese
    Reading and speaking a language don't enable you to guarantee that misunderstanding will not take place

    Usually two negatives make a positive. If reading and speaking a language don't enable you to guarantee that misunderstanding will not take place, then reading and speaking a language does enable you to guarantee that misunderstanding will take place. (I think in this case it doesn't hold true....)
    Thank you, mjscott, for pointing it out.
    It is helpful to me.
    Thanks. :)
     

    liliput

    Senior Member
    U.K. English
    Mjscott made a point about the number of negatives in the sentence, which make it a little confusing - as we see from mjscott's confused response. Actually there are three negatives (counting misunderstanding) so it would perhaps be better phrased as:
    "Being able to read and speak a language does not guarantee perfect understanding".
    "Being able to read and speak a language does not rule out misunderstandings"
    "The ability to read and speak a language is no guarantee against misunderstandings"
    OR
    "Enabling someone to read and speak a language doesn't guarantee that they will understand everything perfectly."
    Other variations are also possible.
     
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