enabled (gifted?)

Phoebe1200

Senior Member
Russian-Russia
Scorpion, TV show
Context: The show is about a team of super-geniuses who try to act as the last line of defense against the complicated threats of the modern world. Each of the team members is gifted. There's a Harvard-trained psychiatrist, a gifted mechanical engineer, a statistics guru also known as a "human calculator" and a genius with an IQ of 197. There's also a little boy genius Ralph on the team and his mom Paige. Paige isn't gifted but she serves as office manager for the team and helps to 'translate' the real world for them, helping them interact with the people they meet. In turn, the team helps her understand her genius son, Ralph.

I've heard a couple of times how the team members were described as "enabled". Also, Paige said it once or twice when the team was on missions and when someone would ask her what gift she had since she's part of the team of geniuses she would reply "Oh, I'm not enabled".

I understood it to mean the same as "gifted" but I didn't find any dictionary entries that had this definition.
Does it mean "gifted"?
 
  • entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    I've never seen it used that way. It's not in common use as the opposite of 'disabled', either. I don't know why they're saying it: it could be an invention for the film, or possibly some people (e.g. child psychologists) do use it.
     

    Phoebe1200

    Senior Member
    Russian-Russia
    Thanks, etb.:)

    Also, the team was sometimes described as "mentally-enabled". Could "enabled" be short for that?
     

    entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    Same objection: I've never seen that used either, and it's not an obvious made-up term for mentally superior or high-achieving.
     

    Phoebe1200

    Senior Member
    Russian-Russia
    So "mentally-enabled" is not common, idiomatic, natural to use for describing mentally superior people and "mentally superior" should be used instead?
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    There's nothing wrong with using 'gifted' where you have asked about 'enabled'. 'Superior' requires somebody to be 'inferior'. 'Gifted' does not.
     

    Phoebe1200

    Senior Member
    Russian-Russia
    Thank you. And just so I'm totally clear, "mentally-enabled" is not common, idiomatic, natural to use for describing mentally-gifted?
     
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