Enact company regulations

DanielSeo

Member
Korean
Hi, can you use the verb "enact" to say new company regulations were established? Or does the term apply only to legislation?

Thank you.
 
  • S1m0n

    Senior Member
    English
    Strictly speaking, you can only enact things that are acts, ie, laws. You could use it for your regulations; people would understand, but the effect would feel somewhat humorous or odd.
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    In fact enact has two origins: (i) to enter onto the official record, i.e. to turn something into an act, statute, or law and (ii) to portray or do something (on stage or figuratively.)
    Hi, can you use the verb "enact" to say new company regulations were established? Or does the term apply only to legislation?
    I think it would be helpful if you gave us an example sentence, Danielseo. :thumbsup:
     

    DanielSeo

    Member
    Korean
    I am reviewing a document that contain company rules and regulations that were established many years ago and have been revised a few times. The document says "Enacted on: Dec. 00, 2002." I don't know if it's correct or not. This is not a law, but internal company rules.
     

    Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    "Enacted" sounds misplaced to me. Company regulations are rarely written to take place at some future date, so there is no need to distinguish the date the rules were applied from the date they were written. "Dated", "written" or "published" would seem more appropriate to me.
     
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