'End of line' products

Discussion in 'English Only' started by natkretep, May 12, 2009.

  1. natkretep

    natkretep Moderato con anima (English Only)

    Singapore
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    I'm writing an article for someone who wants American style employed. I was going to translate a sign on a Paris shop window 'fin de series' as 'end of line' (meaning production of the item has ceased, so they are discounted because the shop wants to get rid of its stock) but thought I should check dictionaries but didn't find it listed in them.

    Online use also seems to be confined to British sites. Can I confirm that this is not used in AE? What would be used then?
     
  2. cuchuflete

    cuchuflete Senior Member

    Maine, EEUU
    EEUU-inglés
    In AE end of line might be used in a manufacturing context, but for retail we more typically say discontinued.
     
  3. ewie

    ewie Senior Member

    Elsewhere
    English English
    Discontinued (lines) is what I'd say too, Nat:)
     
  4. natkretep

    natkretep Moderato con anima (English Only)

    Singapore
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    Many thanks, Cuchu and Ewie. You're superb.
     
  5. JamesM

    JamesM Senior Member

    We also use the word "closeouts" in AE, although "discontinued" sounds a little better to my ear.
     
  6. cuchuflete

    cuchuflete Senior Member

    Maine, EEUU
    EEUU-inglés
    James is correct. Closeouts, however, may mean many things, including
    –discontinued lines
    –styles the retailer will no longer re-order and stock
    –deeply discounted merchandise that is "priced to sell (finally!)"

    These may overlap.
     
  7. whynottail Senior Member

    Hong Kong
    Chinese
    What about- cut-out or remaindered items,

    though I really like- mementoes or keepsakes if the items are cute enough.
     
  8. Parla Member Emeritus

    New York City
    English - US
    In the US, the sign in the store window would likely say CLOSEOUT! XX% OFF!

    "Discontinued line"? Nah.
     
  9. Cagey post mod (English Only / Latin)

    California
    English - US
    I believe that in AE, books are remaindered, but not other things, usually. "Cut-out" is not used this way.

    Momentos and keepsakes are a particular sort of thing, though possibly they could be 'discounted'.
     
  10. Myridon

    Myridon Senior Member

    Texas
    English - US
    I remember "cut-out" being used for discontinued LP records and CD's. There was literally a notch cut out of the album cover or CD case. I can't remember seeing any of these for years.
     
  11. Cagey post mod (English Only / Latin)

    California
    English - US
    That's interesting. I missed these.
     
  12. whynottail Senior Member

    Hong Kong
    Chinese
    Further to Myridon's post, I wish to add the following retrieved from The Corpus of Contemporary American English for sharing-

    He works out new plot lines about giant spiders and keeps an eye out for abandoned couches, which he wrestles into the back of his pickup truck. Then he writes for the rest of the day. On weekends he reupholsters the thrown-away couches in remaindered, discount fabrics.

    PAGE 42: (Top left) Stainless refrigerator and freezer: Sub-Zero. (Bottom left) For used and remaindered building supplies, contact Construction Junction. PAGE 44: (Middle) Arched doorway and plasterwork: John Franklin of Franklin Artisans. Pannier Plage beach basket: Mediterranean Living, Inc. (Top right) Custom-made farm table: JC Woodworking. Antique paisley shawl (across table): Laura Fisher/Antique Quilts &; Americana. Faience yellow plates and glassware: Mediterranean Living, Inc. The love seat and chair are upholstered in La Petite Ferme toile and the sofa in Le Soleil: Waverly. (Bottom right)

    Vintage plaid and striped ribbons are tied into loose bows on the living room's Douglas fir. I always search flea markets Photograph // for the unused rolls of ribbon that dealers purchase from remaindered stock, " says Mary Jane.
     

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