end up with: possible double meaning? [Harry Potter spoiler]

< Previous | Next >

rems

New Member
Russian
From the Harry Potter books (major spoiler for anyone who did not read Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows):


Harry: “If you planned your death with Snape, you meant him to end up with the Elder Wand, didn’t you?”​
Dumbledore: “I admit that was my intention,” said Dumbledore, “but it did not work as I intended, did it?”​



The most obvious meaning here is that Snape will own the Elder Wand after Dumbledore's death.

Is it unambiguous?
Or another meaning is possible?
Perhaps Snape was supposed to set an end to the history of the Elder Wand?



I am asking because only the second meaning is explained in a Wikipedia entry, which seems a little bit strange to me: "When Dumbledore arranged his own death with Severus Snape, he intended Snape to "end up with the Elder Wand." Because his death would not have been the result of his defeat, Dumbledore hoped this might break the wand's power." - Magical objects in Harry Potter, Wikipedia
 
Last edited:
  • GreenWhiteBlue

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    Luckily, I have read all of the Harry Potter books, and I understand this question.:D

    The meaning is unambiguous: Snape will be the person who will have possession of the Elder Wand. As it so happens, though, -- and this is just coincidental to the story, not to the grammatical meaning of the sentence -- since Snape would end up with the wand (that is, get posession of it) by a previously arranged and entirely friendly transfer, the power of the Wand that derived from forcible taking might be finished.
     
    Last edited:

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    I think 'end up with' is always going to mean possession. There might be versions of the sentence using 'end with' that would be ambiguous, but this sentence is not, in my opinion.

    (I am pleased that GWB was able to explain the meaning in that specific context.)
     

    rems

    New Member
    Russian
    Thank you very much! I was confused by this Wikipedia entry.

    So we can consider the statement "Dumbledore hoped this might break the wand's power." to be only a speculation, not explicitly confirmed by this citation from the book?
     
    Last edited:

    GreenWhiteBlue

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    Thank you very much! I was unsure because of this Wikipedia entry.

    So we can consider the statement "Dumbledore hoped this might break the wand's power." to be only a speculation, not explicitly confirmed by this citation from the book?
    I do not have the book at hand, and cannot confirm or deny that with a citiation. Nevertheless, it has nothing to do with the grammatical meaning of the sentence. Whether the statement in Wikipedia is true or false does not change what "end up with" means.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top