Endure vs tolerate

albertovidal

Senior Member
Spanish, Argentina
In the phrase: How much can a man endure with his disgrace
Could I replace "endure" by "tolerate" or these verbs have a different meaning?
Thanks for your reply
 
  • lucas-sp

    Senior Member
    English - Californian
    Since the phrase...
    How much can a man endure with his disgrace
    ... doesn't make that much sense, I would say that it doesn't really matter what verb you use. It doesn't mean much of anything either way.

    That being said, "tolerate" and "endure" don't always mean the same thing. If you could perhaps explain where this is from or what you're attempting to convey, we could probably guide towards the better verb choice.
     

    albertovidal

    Senior Member
    Spanish, Argentina
    Since the phrase... ... doesn't make that much sense, I would say that it doesn't really matter what verb you use. It doesn't mean much of anything either way.

    That being said, "tolerate" and "endure" don't always mean the same thing. If you could perhaps explain where this is from or what you're attempting to convey, we could probably guide towards the better verb choice.
    Sorry but I misquoted the phrase. It should be "How can a man endure his disgrace?"
    This man has suffered the loss of his wife and children in a car accident and he wonders "How can a man..."
    So, my question is: are "tolerate" and "endure" synonyms in this phrase?
     

    lucas-sp

    Senior Member
    English - Californian
    The loss of one's family is not normally considered a "disgrace." If it is a disgrace, it's probably on the part of the driver responsible for the accident. So I'm still confused about this sentence. Where did you find it?
     

    albertovidal

    Senior Member
    Spanish, Argentina
    The loss of one's family is not normally considered a "disgrace." If it is a disgrace, it's probably on the part of the driver responsible for the accident. So I'm still confused about this sentence. Where did you find it?
    Well, it was the man who caused the accident, beacuse he was a little drunk, and all his family died. So, he doesn't know if he'll be able to put up with his guilt.

    Is this enough for you to figure out what he's wondering himself?
    Thanks for all your replies
     

    lucas-sp

    Senior Member
    English - Californian
    Isn't it surprising how context and background can really clear up these kinds of issues. (No, it really isn't surprising, actually.) Ideally, you would also give your source, because the date of publication/dialect of the author are also important.

    Note that "his guilt" is not the same as "his disgrace." I'm also confused about whether it is "his" or "this" in the original sentence.

    I'm really confused about what the sentence you're citing is. Is it "How much can a man endure his/this disgrace?" or "How much disgrace can a man endure?" or "How can a man endure his/this disgrace?" Please give the actual citation.
     

    albertovidal

    Senior Member
    Spanish, Argentina
    The book is "The value of human suffering" by Wayne Jackson.
    And the whole sentence reads as follows:
    "A family cannot endure the loss of their 17-year old daughter in a car accident while she was going to the beach over the spring break holiday.
    His father, who allowed her to drive his car, wonders if he and his wife will be able to put up with such a disgrace."

    Hope it helps
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Alberto, did you find the two sentences in the book you mention? Or have you written them as a description of something that happens in the book?
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Thanks, alberto.

    In that case, I should say that I find both the sentences slightly strange - especially the second one. The "his" in "his father" is odd (should it be "her"?) and "put up with such a disgrace" looks odd, too - both in terms of the collocation "put up with"+"disgrace", and in terms of the use of the word "disgrace" (I was wondering whether it was a false friend with a similar-looking word in Spanish...).

    Anyway, if you're asking whether "endure" in the first sentence could be replaced by "tolerate", my answer would be 'no, it couldn't':).
     
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