ENG But I do, (West) FLEMISH Maar ik doe : ingweonism?

ThomasK

Senior Member
Belgium, Dutch
I do not know what you call this kind of shortened/... replies, , where the verb is repeated or replaced by some form of 'to do':pronominal clauses [because the verb is [pro-] replaced by some form of "to do" (replies very welcome). In this case it would be a reply to for example something like : "But you have not eaten your pudding!... --- But I have (do?)!/ Jakkedoe!"

However, my question is: could it be an ingweonism, as i see something similar in (West) Flemish, to some extent at least?

Some examples:
Are you coming to the party? ENG Oh yes, we are. FLE ja-m (yes-we-XXX) +/-
You don't drink tea, I guess! ENG But we do! FLE ja-me-doen (yes-we-do)! +
ENG Do you? FLE gij-wel? (you-... [opposite of "no way/..." ]) -
 
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  • ThomasK

    Senior Member
    Belgium, Dutch
    Well, you might be right, but it is only in part an old-fashioned ellipsis as the "do" is used. Don't you think?

    How about Norwegian? Do you have/ recognize the same or a similar phenomenon?
     

    myšlenka

    Senior Member
    Norwegian
    Well, you might be right, but it is only in part an old-fashioned ellipsis as the "do" is used. Don't you think?
    It depends on your level of analysis. If you see "do" as an expression of tense only and assume that tense cannot be elided in English and West Flemish, the pattern you're asking about falls right into the ellipsis basket.
    How about Norwegian? Do you have/ recognize the same or a similar phenomenon?
    Yes. I would think ellipsis is (near) universal.
     

    ThomasK

    Senior Member
    Belgium, Dutch
    It depends on your level of analysis. If you see "do" as an expression of tense only and assume that tense cannot be elided in English and West Flemish, the pattern you're asking about falls right into the ellipsis basket.
    I am not think of it as a expression of tense or anything in particular. That kind of indication is often redundant. It is just a grammatical/... phenomenon as for me, but this use of "do" and/or repetition of the subject (yes-I, yes-you) is uncommon, in my view. I just want to hear whether it is something particular and...
    Yes. I would think ellipsis is (near) universal.
    ... more than ellipsis, which may indeed be universal but... let(s just see whether other foreros have other ideas. I like exploring things and checking - even seemingly bizarre - hypotheses!
     

    ThomasK

    Senior Member
    Belgium, Dutch
    As for eillipsis: ELT illustrates that with this exchange:
    A: Have you done the washing up?
    B: Not yet


    But the "I do" is not an ellipsis (except a semantic substitution of a whole part of the sentence. But I cannot find the name of the "Yes/But I do" phrases...
     
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    berndf

    Moderator
    German (Germany)
    But I cannot find the name of the "Yes/But I do" phrases...
    Echo answer

    Echo answers are common in many languages. When I was in (German) high school, it would have counted as an grammar fault not to use echo answers and answer a binary question with a bare yes or no.

    PIE had no simple word for yes and even Latin still had one. Words for yes generally developed out of intensifier adverbs.
     
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