engage for

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jokker

Senior Member
Chinese/Taiwan
Hi,

Can you explain this sentence? I have no idea what "engage for" means and don't know what this "assure" means here.

It is more than I engage for, I assure you.

Thank you.
 
  • GenJen54

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    Hi jokker,

    Welcome to the Forums. Since engage has a few meanings, could you please provide us with some "context" so we may better understand what you are asking.

    The particular sentence does not make much sense in that the word "engage" seems out of context.

    Thank you.
     

    maxiogee

    Banned
    English
    It would appear to suggest that someone freelance is being hired for a one-off job, and being offered more than they usually request.

    Employer: I am prepared to pay €1000 for you to guide me around Rome for a week.
    "Talent": That's a lot of money. Are you sure?
    Employer: I've heard how good you are.
    "Talent": It's more than I (usually) engage for, I assure you.
     

    jokker

    Senior Member
    Chinese/Taiwan
    GenJen54 said:
    Hi jokker,

    Welcome to the Forums. Since engage has a few meanings, could you please provide us with some "context" so we may better understand what you are asking.

    The particular sentence does not make much sense in that the word "engage" seems out of context.

    Thank you.
    Thank you and sorry for not providing the context.

    Here is the context:
    "But, my dear, you must indeed go and see Mr. Bingley when he comes into the neighbourhood."
    "It is more than I engage for, I assure you."
     

    maxiogee

    Banned
    English
    Has "my dear" already made some commitments? It sounds like this is one commitment too far. Whoever this "my dear" is, they are not prepared to go and see Mr. Bingley.

    But, luckily, you will probably know from the book what the exact usage is, before you would get the definitive meaning from your fellow foreros!
     

    jokker

    Senior Member
    Chinese/Taiwan
    maxiogee said:
    Has "my dear" already made some commitments? It sounds like this is one commitment too far. Whoever this "my dear" is, they are not prepared to go and see Mr. Bingley.

    But, luckily, you will probably know from the book what the exact usage is, before you would get the definitive meaning from your fellow foreros!
    No, this "my dear" has not made commitment yet.

    Excuse me. What does "It sounds like this is one commitment too far" mean ??

    This "my dear" is Mr. Bennet in Pride and Prejudice. He won't go and his wife want him to go.

    No, I don't know what this "engage for" means in the book and can't understand it from the book.
     

    maxiogee

    Banned
    English
    No I think I have enough.
    "One commitment too far" was my way of saying that Mr Bennett has made commitments to do certain things. This one is one too many. His wife has gone too far in asking him to do this.

    'To engage' can mean to promise (it is where we get the word for a couple who have agreed to married - an engaged couple; They have promised to marry.
    The husband is saying that it is more than he will promise. Austen is using words in ways we no longer use them. Her use of "engage for" would probably be written nowadays (if we wrote that way) as "it is more than I will engage for" = it is more than I can promise.
     

    jokker

    Senior Member
    Chinese/Taiwan
    maxiogee said:
    No I think I have enough.
    "One commitment too far" was my way of saying that Mr Bennett has made commitments to do certain things. This one is one too many. His wife has gone too far in asking him to do this.

    'To engage' can mean to promise (it is where we get the word for a couple who have agreed to married - an engaged couple; They have promised to marry.
    The husband is saying that it is more than he will promise. Austen is using words in ways we no longer use them. Her use of "engage for" would probably be written nowadays (if we wrote that way) as "it is more than I will engage for" = it is more than I can promise.
    Thank you very much, maxiogee.:)

    So, can I understand 'It is more than I engage for,' as 'No, it is not my business, and I won't do it.' ?

    And how about 'I assure you'? Does this 'I assure you' equal to "I promise you that' ?
     

    maxiogee

    Banned
    English
    "His business" is not involved. It is more "This is something I will not do."

    "I assure you" in this circumstance is more like "Don't try to make me. I've made my mind up."
     

    DaleC

    Senior Member
    jokker said:
    maxiogee, should I offer more context?
    First, you presented just the sentence. In a second email, you provided some adjacent sentences. In a final email, you revealed the source, which is a novel almost two hundred years old.

    I wonder why forum members divide this information into multiple posts. Learners should take note that when they don't understand a word from a very old book, maybe it's because that use of the word is very old fashioned even to native speakers. People cannot give reliable translations with incomplete information.
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    I want to stress the importance of DaleC's message.
    Current English usage is not always the same as the English used in Pride and Prejudice.
    If you want us to help explain something from a book or other source, it is very important that your question says so.

    If you are asking about the text in Pride and Prejudice, you should tell us.
     

    nichec

    Senior Member
    Chinese(Taiwan)/English(AE)
    Okay, I know this is not important, but he did go to see him even before his wife asked him to in the book. When he said that he wouldn't and didn't care to go, it's just an irony way the character speaks in the whole book. (at least this is what I remember)
     

    jokker

    Senior Member
    Chinese/Taiwan
    maxiogee said:
    "His business" is not involved. It is more "This is something I will not do."

    "I assure you" in this circumstance is more like "Don't try to make me. I've made my mind up."
    Thank you very much again, maxiogee.
     

    jokker

    Senior Member
    Chinese/Taiwan
    Thank you for the suggestion of telling the source or the book.

    nichec said:
    Okay, I know this is not important, but he did go to see him even before his wife asked him to in the book. When he said that he wouldn't and didn't care to go, it's just an irony way the character speaks in the whole book. (at least this is what I remember)
    Hi, nichec. It's "after" as far as I know.
     

    maxiogee

    Banned
    English
    jokker said:
    Thank you for the suggestion of telling the source or the book.


    Hi, nichec. It's "after" as far as I know.
    This just goes to whow that when a man thinks he has his mind made up about something, there is a woman somewhere who thinks otherwise! :D
     

    marylou2010

    Senior Member
    German (Swiss)
    Dear all

    Can I use "engage for" in this context: It's an option for people who want to engage themself for the animals. ? Does that makes sense and is it gramatically acceptable? Thanks a lot:)
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    Does that makes sense - No
    and
    is it gramatically acceptable? -No


    It's an option for people who want to engage themself for the animals. = Something is an option for people who wish to promise to be married for the advantage of the animals. - which is nonsense.

    I have tried to make an idiomatic English sentence:

    Optionally, people may engage with the animals.

    but this has failed.

    I assume that by "engage" you are trying to say, "touch" or "be with". 'To engage' does not work - forget it.
     

    marylou2010

    Senior Member
    German (Swiss)
    Thanks for your feedback Paul Q. I wanted to express the meaning of "support" or "do sth. for" by using "engage for". It doesn't work, does it?
     
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