engagement, embodied human beings

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cmabill

New Member
Chinese
As he is aware of his own sublime communion with all things, nature becomes an inspiring force of rapture, a power that reveals the workings of the soul. To Wordsworth, nature acts as a substitute for imaginative and intellectual engagement with the development of embodied human beings in their diverse circumstances.

is there anyone who could simplify the sentence after " substitute for" and what is exact meaning of engagement in here? thank you.
 
  • owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    Hello, cmabill.

    I'm sorry, but that sentence looks like long-winded, pretentious nonsense to me. If I had to paraphrase it for some reason, I suppose I'd say that Wordsworth looks at nature as a substitute for the interaction of humans in civilized environments.

    Though I've read a few poems by Wordsworth in my day, I never got that message from those poems.
     

    cmabill

    New Member
    Chinese
    Hello Owlman5

    thank you for your comment and explanation, I am not sure where this paragraph originally comes from, but someone ask the meaning on internet and I find it's a little complicated and hard to interpret it.

    your answer is very helpful and informed that I should not pay much attention to such pretentious sentences. thank you. ,
     
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