English allies or the English allies

Oros

Senior Member
Korean
CDMA also refers to digital cellular telephony systems that make use of this multiple access scheme, such as those pioneered by Qualcomm, or W-CDMA. CDMA is a military technology first used during World War II by English allies to foil German attempts at jamming transmissions. The allies decided to transmit over several frequencies, instead of one, making it difficult for the Germans to pick up the complete signal.
CDMA has since been used in many communications systems, including the Global Positioning System (GPS) and in the OmniTRACS satellite system for transportation logistics.
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You will read the words 'World Wár II by English allies to foil German attempts''

I think it should be ''the World War II by the English allies to foil German attempts''

The words or rather the articles 'the' must be there.

I would like to read your comments on this.
 
  • maxiogee

    Banned
    English
    Oros said:
    CDMA also refers to digital cellular telephony systems that make use of this multiple access scheme, such as those pioneered by Qualcomm, or W-CDMA. CDMA is a military technology first used during World War II by English allies to foil German attempts at jamming transmissions. The allies decided to transmit over several frequencies, instead of one, making it difficult for the Germans to pick up the complete signal.
    CDMA has since been used in many communications systems, including the Global Positioning System (GPS) and in the OmniTRACS satellite system for transportation logistics.
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    You will read the words 'World Wár II by English allies to foil German attempts''

    I think it should be ''the World War II by the English allies to foil German attempts''

    The words or rather the articles 'the' must be there.

    I would like to read your comments on this.

    I don't use "the" with "World War II", I would use it with "the Second World War".

    The "the" should be there when referring to "Allies".
    What should not be there is "English".
    There were two sides in the Second World War, they are, by convention, called "The Allies" and "The Axis Powers".
    If "Englishness" must be included then I'd refer to "England and her allies".
    To say "the English Allies" is to exclude England - as one cannot (grammatically correctly) be included in one's own "possessive" noun.

    Also, France would be loath to admit to being "English Allies" as that would have implied a non-equal status.
     

    Kelly B

    Curmodgeratrice
    USA English
    With the article, the phrase clunks. I read it

    ...used during WWII by the English... wait. what? where does allies fit in here? Adding the article ensures that I read the word English as the noun, rather than a modifier of allies. On second reading, I wonder: the English, allies of whom? Yes, I can go back and reread it a third time to understand it properly, but it's not smooth.

    Frankly, I think the article should be left out unless you eliminate English altogether, as Maxiogee suggested, or use the allies of the English.
     

    Yôn

    Senior Member
    US English
    No article, plain and simple. Also, capitalizing "Allies" makes the sentence look better to me.

    If you are trying to specify that the English were Allies, while only talking about the English, you could say something like:

    "...military technology first used during World War II by Allied forces, specifically the English, to foil German..."

    I don't think saying this as "Second World War" and placing "the" in front of it would be appropriate, since "II" follows "World War." If you are going to pronounce it that way, then simply read it with the article included, but don't write it.

    That's all my opinion though, and you can sort of do as you please here, because people will still easily be able to understand what you mean and were you're coming from.




    Jon
     
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