English: entourage (pronunciation)

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Martoo

Senior Member
Español (porteño)
Hi everybody, recently I've found this word "entourage" and heard the pronunciation in the dictionary. Noticed that had a pronunciation similar to "massage" (speaking mainly of the end of the word) and not like others words as 'rampage', 'sabotage', 'vintage' or simply 'age'.
I know that massage is a word taked from the French but I would like to know if the same happens with "entourage".

Thanks!
 
  • Agró

    Senior Member
    Spanish-Navarre
    UK:*/ˈɒnturɑːʒ/
    US:/ˌɑntʊˈrɑʒ/ ,USA pronunciation: respelling(än′tŏŏ räzh)

    Etimology
    • French, equivalent. to entour(er) to surround (derivative of entour around, equivalent. to en in + tour circuit; see tour) + -age -age
    • 1825–35
     

    gburtonio

    Senior Member
    UK, English
    In more recent French loans like 'sabotage', 'massage' and 'entourage', the [aʒ] pronunciation is preserved. In older loans like 'vintage', 'age', 'language' the pronunciation tends to be /eɪdʒ/ or /ɪdʒ/ / /ədʒ/. There are three possible pronunciations of 'garage', though.

    Nigel Farage was once criticised by David Cameron for pronuncing his name in a "poncey, foreign-sounding" way (i.e. /ɑ:ʒ/).
     

    elroy

    Imperfect mod
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    I thought @gburtonio meant three different pronunciations of the -age.

    I didn't know /-ɑ:ʒ/ with first-syllable stress was a thing! That feels like it violates English phonotactics!
     

    AndrasBP

    Senior Member
    Hungarian
    "Outrage" is an interesting example because it's a very old French loan from the 13th century, so it "should" be pronounced /ˈaʊtrɪdʒ/ or /'aʊtrədʒ/, but the pronunciation later changed to /'aʊtreɪdʒ/ when speakers reanalysed the word as "out" + "rage".
     

    berndf

    Moderator
    German (Germany)
    "Outrage" is an interesting example because it's a very old French loan from the 13th century, so it "should" be pronounced /ˈaʊtrɪdʒ/ or /'aʊtrədʒ/, but the pronunciation later changed to /'aʊtreɪdʒ/ when speakers reanalysed the word as "out" + "rage".
    /-eɪdʒ/ is only in old loans. Stress on the first syllable may but not necessarily does lead to a reduced vowels in the second syllable.
     
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    Martoo

    Senior Member
    Español (porteño)
    the pronunciation tends to be /eɪdʒ/ or /ɪdʒ/ / /ədʒ/. There are three possible pronunciations of 'garage', though.
    Curious...and what about the pronunciation with "æʃ"? -> like occurs in the word ash (please ignore the sound of the vowel, I only refer to the sh)

    That seems the common way to pronunciate that word in spanish (at least in my country :p)
     

    jimquk

    Member
    English
    "Outrage" is an interesting example because it's a very old French loan from the 13th century, so it "should" be pronounced /ˈaʊtrɪdʒ/ or /'aʊtrədʒ/, but the pronunciation later changed to /'aʊtreɪdʒ/ when speakers reanalysed the word as "out" + "rage".
    Also the meaning has been influenced by that re-analysis: in French the word is based on outre, = beyond, and might be calqued as "beyondage", ie going beyond limits, transgression. But I don't think that French carries the connotation of rage that seems clear in English.
     

    AndrasBP

    Senior Member
    Hungarian
    The pronunciation of "outrage" is explained by @gburtonio's observation: Do you disagree with him?
    I wouldn't say his post explains why 'outrage' is different from other two- or three-syllable words ending in -age, such as:
    courage, message, village, manage, image, savage, voyage, hostage, baggage, average, heritage, beverage, etc.

    (cage, page, stage only have one syllable)
     

    gburtonio

    Senior Member
    UK, English
    I wouldn't say his post explains why 'outrage' is different from other two- or three-syllable words ending in -age, such as:
    courage, message, village, manage, image, savage, voyage, hostage, baggage, average, heritage, beverage, etc.

    (cage, page, stage only have one syllable)
    The expected pronunciation is /ɪdʒ/ (or /ədʒ/) in 2+ syllable words. This also happens in modern neologisms like 'wattage'. The explanation given above for the /eɪdʒ/ pronunciation in 'outrage' seems convincing to me. 'Rampage' is different. It started off as a verb (attested from 1692), of uncertain etymological origin. According to the OED, as a verb it can be stressed on the second syllable, although I have never heard this pronunciation; the OED states that the stress in early use is uncertain. In any case, it's not a -age noun loan from French like the others, which probably helps explain the /eɪdʒ/ pronunciation (particularly if the stress started off on the second syllable).

    Are there other 2+ syllable -age words with the unexpected /eɪdʒ/ pronunciation? I can't think of any.
     

    berndf

    Moderator
    German (Germany)
    Are there other 2+ syllable -age words with the unexpected /eɪdʒ/ pronunciation? I can't think of any.
    It has nothing to do with being 1 or 2 syllable but with stress pattern. It the -age rhyme carries primary stress, it is regularly /-eɪdʒ/; if not then the vowel is mostly reduced but not always.

    In ME, outrage probably originally had 3 syllables (/oʊtrɑːdʒə/, /oʊtrɑːdʒi/ or /uːtrɑːdʒə/, /uːtrɑːdʒi/ in some regions) with only the 3rd syllable being fully unstressed. /eɪ/ is the regular late ModE outcome of ME /ɑː/.

    Even if the third syllable had already been mute at the time of the loan from French/Anglo-French the /ɑː/ wouldn't necessarily have been reduced. Maybe similar to pronunciations in modern English loans from French like garage = /ˈɡæɹɑːʒ/.
     
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    gburtonio

    Senior Member
    UK, English
    It has nothing to do with being 1 or 2 syllable but with stress pattern. It the -age rhyme carries primary stress, it is regularly /-eɪdʒ/; if not then the vowel is mostly reduced but not always.
    Yes, I realise that. I just wrote 2+ to exclude single-syllable words where 'age' can only carry primary stress and /-eɪdʒ/ is therefore the expected pronunciation. I'm curious about the 'but not always' words – are there others apart from 'outrage' and 'rampage'?
     
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