English follows

takashi0930

Senior Member
Japanese
When we write an email at international companies in Japan, we often write sentences in Japanese first, and then the English version of them below Japanese. In the beginning of the email, we write something like "English follows." in order to let non-Japanese speakers know that there is an English version after the Japanese sentences. Is "English follows." correct? Are there any alternatives you (native English speakers) would suggest?
 
  • lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    If you write “English follows” immediately above the Japanese text, that might seem a little odd. You could perhaps say, for example, “Scroll down for English version” or “An English version follows the Japanese”.
     

    takashi0930

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    Thank you!

    Why did you put “an” in the second example, but not in the the first example?
     
    Last edited:

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    In abbreviated forms like this, the article can be omitted, and in my first example that works fine. But in the second example:

    English version follows Japanese :tick: (This is fine but implies that the reader knows there’s a translation)
    English version follows the Japanese :thumbsdown: (Could be used but doesn’t sound very good, in my view)
    An English version follows Japanese :cross:
    An English version follows the Japanese :tick: (This is fine and does not imply that the reader knows there’s a translation)
     

    Orble

    Senior Member
    Australian English
    “English follows” might be too abbreviated for an email. It will depend upon what style and level of formality a particular workplace culture considers appropriate. For example, I have experienced emails from IT workplaces that use a very informal style that in my own formal workplace of the time seemed a bit slapdash but they were never questioned and always understood. They would certainly say things like: “Code follows”, “specs below”, “flow diagram attached”. But I might have said, following my own more formal workplace norms:

    I have attached a flow diagram.

    A translation for English speakers follows my Japanese.
     

    DonnyB

    Sixties Mod
    English UK Southern Standard English
    Coincidentally, I got an email this morning written in German, which started off: "<english and french below>". :)
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    I think if you want it short, 'English version follows' or 'English version below' works for me. (This is close to lingobingo's suggestions.)
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Yes. My only reservation was that it might be confusing to put something like “English below” directly above the Japanese!
     
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