English speakers aren’t going to understand [Why 'going to' not 'will'?]

daniar

Senior Member
Bulgarian
I was a reading an article about speaking with a native speaker as an easier way to be understood and I read this:"Of course, native English speakers aren’t going to understand 100% of everything you say. "Why is "be going to" used when the person writes down what he thinks, believes or knows will happen, it's not a prediction based on the present situation ( that's one of thle cases when we use be going to, as much as I know)?
Thanks in advance.
 
  • ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    Ah but it is a prediction, Daniar: "I [the author] predict that English speakers won't understand 100% of everything you say":) He doesn't know it, because he doesn't know the people he's speaking to ~ but he has (presumably) enough experience to be able to predict it.
     

    DW

    Banned
    Polish
    Both will and going to are used talking about predictions yet in slightly different situations.

    You use will for prediction when you have no real evidence, while going to when there's some evidence.
     

    Liam Lew's

    Senior Member
    As ewie said before, the author seems to have some experience and seems to be very certain about his statement. I think that's the reason for the "going to future". And as DW said, we use the "going to future" if there is some evidence. The experience is the evidence in this case, I think.
     

    daniar

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    I don't know...When he talked about the future, the author of the article used only will for something he also had experience for,and only one sentence, that I mentioned, with going to. But I still think that will is more appropriate here because as I wrote, we've learned that when we use going to, the prediction is based on the present situation, not on a past one,right?
     

    daniar

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    But now, when I think more carefully, I can say that we can use either will or going to here . He has a whole lot of experience and NOW, basing on it, he says this.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    I don't know...When he talked about the future, the author of the article used only will for something he also had experience for,and only one sentence, that I mentioned, with going to. But I still think that will is more appropriate here because as I wrote, we've learned that when we use going to, the prediction is based on the present situation, not on a past one,right?
    I've highlighted the key issue ou are struggling with. In this post, you learnt that, in your own words "Thanks, now I see. I thought that everything's absolutely strict, but I was actually wrong."

    You are correct that this "rule" about will and going to is not "absolutely strict" - it is a guideline that is given to help learners with the choice between these two. I posted this in another thread but it bears repeating here
    I found a good description that is not dogmatic! Here is a quote from MyEnglishTeacher.com
    Though will and be going to mean almost the same thing and are interchangeable sometimes, there are some situations when one is used more than the other.
    The sentence you quote in the first post is an example where native speakers may use either form interchangeably. We are not taught this so-called "rule".
     
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