Enjoying swimming(?), she goes to the pool daily.

EdisonBhola

Senior Member
Korean
#1
Another problem sentence wrote by my son's English teacher:

"Enjoying swimming, she goes to the pool daily."

My son is learning participle phrases at school now. This sentence I think sounds very wrong. I think it doesn't make sense the way it is. It sounds better like this:

Because she enjoys swimming, she goes to the pool daily.

My query is, strictly speaking, is the teacher's sentence correct?
 
  • sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    #3
    To me,

    EdisonBhola::thumbsup:

    Teacher: :thumbsdown:

    The way it's crafted it appears to be an out of place gerund. (Although it's not)

    Note than it's helpful to mention whether a teacher is a native English speaker and if so, which variety.
     
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    boozer

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    #4
    The sentence sounds wrong.

    'Enjoying swimming' seems like a failed attempt at describing the manner in which she goes to the pool. :)

    PS. Cross posted with everyone. I am filled with noble envy - I wish I had had Pob's brilliant idea. :D It was just around the corner from where I stood. :)
     
    English - England
    #5
    Pace everyone else, I don't think this sentence is actually incorrect.

    I don't think we are dealing with a gerund either.

    Surely we can say White in the face, she walked into the room. The adjectival phrase at the start clearly modifies the subject.

    Enjoying swimming, she goes daily to the pool
    might be better expressed As she enjoys swimming, she goes daily to the pool, but I can't see much technically wrong with it per se. I wonder if the people who object to it would also object to the grammatically similar Being fond of swimming, she goes daily to the pool.

    I'm discounting the obvious infelicity of the two -ing endings together, of course. The enjoying could easily sound like a current activity rather than a state of mind: that's why being fond of is an improvement, in my mind.
     

    e2efour

    Senior Member
    UK English
    #10
    What does correct mean?
    It would be difficult to call this poor sentence ungrammatical, unless there is some rule about the type of participle that starts a sentence.
    On the other hand, most native speakers (I hope!) would agree that the style is inappropriate.
    So I assume that correct in #1 means suitable.
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    #11
    I'm just chiming in with e2efour. The sentence is grammatically correct, but probably stylistically inept or stilted. The problem with a stilted sentence is that sometimes, when placed in the right context, it might become not stilted!
     

    se16teddy

    Senior Member
    English - England
    #12
    Enjoying swimming, she goes to the pool daily.

    In this sentence enjoying swimming is a participial phrase. Participial phrases with present participles are typical of formal written varieties of English, and sound odd in a sentence about going swimming.
     
    UK ENGLISH
    #14
    I don't object to it either, but I might well add as she does to it:

    Enjoying swimming as she does.....

    The problem is that (to me) it sounds rather old-fashioned written this way and, as Thomas says, the two -ing endings make it sound a tad awkward. As she enjoys.... sounds better to me too.;)
     

    Franco-filly

    Senior Member
    English - Southern England
    #15
    I don't object to it either, but I might well add as she does to it:

    Enjoying swimming as she does.....

    The problem is that (to me) it sounds rather old-fashioned written this way and, as Thomas says, the two -ing endings make it sound a tad awkward. As she enjoys.... sounds better to me too.;)
    I agree!
     
    English - England
    #16
    What do you mean by that? Does it mean "enjoying swimming" is wrong?
    No, but it is, as I said, clumsy, for the reason I gave.

    Incidentally, Edison, please don't hack about my post and then put it in quotes, as though I write like that. You could create the wrong impression. It would be kind now to remove the Pace from the quote in your post #13. There isn't a word PaceI'm.
     

    shorty1

    Senior Member
    Korean
    #17
    To become a participle clause expressing 'reason'(=cause), the infinite verb is supposed to be a state verb, not an action verb.

    'Enjoying swimming' is a repeated action, not a state.

    For that reason the original sentence would sound odd to many native speakers, I think.

    But I'm not sure...
     
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    EdisonBhola

    Senior Member
    Korean
    #18
    No, but it is, as I said, clumsy, for the reason I gave.

    Incidentally, Edison, please don't hack about my post and then put it in quotes, as though I write like that. You could create the wrong impression. It would be kind now to remove the Pace from the quote in your post #13. There isn't a word PaceI'm.
    I just fixed it. Sorry about my carelessness.
     
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