ennoblecer una vivienda

LaurieRdMn

Member
Spanish, Spain and English, UK
The paragraph goes like this:

"Fruto de su prosperidad fue el ennoblecimiento de gran parte de sus viviendas, en las que proliferan los sillares y dinteles de granito".

"As a result of the village’s prosperity is the ennoblement of most of its houses and there is an extended use blocks of stone or ashlars as well as granite lintels in their architecture".

Sounds kind of strange somehow.
 
  • DrMiguel01

    Senior Member
    Latin American Spanish
    Dear LaurieRdMn:

    As I understand the phrase, tt seems to me that it says:

    ". . . “embelishment of a large number of their houses, with abundance of granite ashlars and lintels.”

    Have a great day!
     

    Bmm5045

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    As for the phrase in question, I would just like to know if the meaning you want is "to ennoble" (become noble, become respected, become great) or "to embellish" (become decorated, become adorned, become more beautiful).

    The rest of the translation has a few issues though. I would say: "A result of its prosperity was the (ennoblecimiento) of most of its homes, in which the use of granite ashlar and lintels spread greatly/dramatically"

    "Ashlar" is an odd word. It either means a single block, or it can refer to the aesthetic of stone blocks more collectively, but it really isn't used as a normal countable noun where you can say "2 ashlars, 3 ashlars, etc."
     

    LaurieRdMn

    Member
    Spanish, Spain and English, UK
    It is, isn't it? I'd never heard of it before to be honest. Nonetheless, I found this description: Ashlar is finely dressed (cut, worked) masonry, either an individual stone that has been worked until squared or the masonry built of such stone. So I suppose it can be 1 ashlar, 2 ashlars too.
    I agree with translating ennoblecimiento as embelishment instead ennoblement. Makes much more sense as it talks about the outward appearence of a house and sounds better too.
    Thanks a lot to the both of you.
     

    Bmm5045

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    Sorry I'm not sure why I didn't think of this in response to the OP: "adornment" might work even better in place of "embellishment"
     
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