Enough money/ the enough money

< Previous | Next >

moseen

Senior Member
Farsi
Hello everybody!
In the conversation below, can't we say "the enough money"? Because the amount of money is specify and in the last sentence "money" has the "the".

Dan likes fat cars, but he doesn't have one.
He doesn't have enough money.
If he had the money, he would by a car.
Reference: English grammar in use by Raymond Murphy, unit 100, part 1.
 
Last edited:
  • e2efour

    Senior Member
    UK English
    It's not a combination of words that anyone uses. What kind of sentence are you thinking of?

    As for why, it might help to give a definition of enough. It can be called a quantifier, which comes before a noun and tells you an amount of something that is enough/sufficient.

    Similar words are any, little, some.
    You can ask someone Is there any cheese left in the fridge?
    We cannot say Is there the any cheese left?

    Enough
    and sufficient can be thought of as adjectives that mean the same.
    Example: She does not have enough/sufficient knowledge to solve this problem.

    Sufficient
    can sometimes be used with an article:
    Example: You need a balanced diet to get the/a sufficient amount of vitamins and minerals (but not "an enough amount").
    In this sentence we could say get sufficient vitamins or get enough vitamins.

    I cannot tell you why an enough does not work, nor is it necessary to know why (if this means anything) in order to learn English.
    It is the job of grammarians to make up theories and definitions on the basis of how people speak.

    To summarise, you can talk about a sufficient quantity of something, but not an enough quantity.
     

    heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    :thumbsup: Sometimes the only answer to 'why?' is 'because we do/don't', or 'because it makes no sense'.

    I can't think of a context in which we would say 'the enough . . . '.
     

    moseen

    Senior Member
    Farsi
    It's not a combination of words that anyone uses. What kind of sentence are you thinking of?

    As for why, it might help to give a definition of enough. It can be called a quantifier, which comes before a noun and tells you an amount of something that is enough/sufficient.

    Similar words are any, little, some.
    You can ask someone Is there any cheese left in the fridge?
    We cannot say Is there the any cheese left?

    Enough
    and sufficient can be thought of as adjectives that mean the same.
    Example: She does not have enough/sufficient knowledge to solve this problem.

    Sufficient
    can sometimes be used with an article:
    Example: You need a balanced diet to get the/a sufficient amount of vitamins and minerals (but not "an enough amount").
    In this sentence we could say get sufficient vitamins or get enough vitamins.

    I cannot tell you why an enough does not work, nor is it necessary to know why (if this means anything) in order to learn English.
    It is the job of grammarians to make up theories and definitions on the basis of how people speak.

    To summarise, you can talk about a sufficient quantity of something, but not an enough quantity.
    Thank you very much for your help.
    :thumbsup: Sometimes the only answer to 'why?' is 'because we do/don't', or 'because it makes no sense'.

    I can't think of a context in which we would say 'the enough . . . '.
    Thank you very much for your help.
    Thanks you for your help Sound Shift.
     
    Last edited:

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    The problem is with "enough". If enough qualifies a singular noun, it follows that noun in the form of a reduced adjectival clause:
    "It was a castle enough to keep out the enemy":tick: = "It was a castle that was enough to keep out the enemy"

    If enough qualifies a plural noun, it precedes the noun that it qualifies:
    "He had enough apples to make a pie.":tick:

    All uncountable nouns are singular:

    "He had the enough money to buy a car.":cross:
    "He had the money enough to buy a car." :tick: = "He had the money that was enough to buy a car."
     

    moseen

    Senior Member
    Farsi
    The problem is with "enough". If enough qualifies a singular noun, it follows that noun in the form of a reduced adjectival clause:
    "It was a castle enough to keep out the enemy":tick: = "It was a castle that was enough to keep out the enemy"

    If enough qualifies a plural noun, it precedes the noun that it qualifies:
    "He had enough apples to make a pie.":tick:

    All uncountable nouns are singular:

    "He had the enough money to buy a car.":cross:
    "He had the money enough to buy a car." :tick: = "He had the money that was enough to buy a car."
    Thank you very much for your help.
    How can write "he doesnt have enough money"?
    But even so, nine times out of ten we'd still omit "the".
    Thank you very much for your help.
     
    Last edited:

    heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    How can you/one write "he doesnt have enough money"?

    Exactly like that - but with a capital letter at the beginning, and an apostrophe in 'doesn't'.

    He doesn't have enough money. :tick:
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top