enrol in university is OK, but can you register at university?

kuleshov

Senior Member
Spain Spanish
I've always used enrol in/on, but since you can use the term registration when talking about university, I was wondering if you can register at university meaning enrolling in unviersity.

I wouldn't collocate register with university, but you never know...

Any ideas?
 
  • audiolaik

    Senior Member
    Polish
    I've always used enrol in/on, but since you can use the term registration when talking about university, I was wondering if you can register at university meaning enrolling in unviersity.

    I wouldn't collocate register with university, but you never know...

    Any ideas?
    Hello,

    I am far from jumping to the conclusion that the two words mean the same. I would say that you can register at university; however, it would simply mean that you have access to certain university web pages, for example.
     

    gasman

    Senior Member
    Canada, English
    I must admit I have never heard of "enrolling " into a university. I have registered at the beginning of each academic year, and subsequently onto my professional association, yet we enrolled at school annually. It seems an oddity in usage.
     

    vicky1027

    Senior Member
    usa english
    Well, I think when you're "enrolled" it means you've applied , you've been accepted and plan on attending a College/University. To me, you register for your classes. In other words, you choose your classes for a semester.
     

    Nunty

    Modified
    Hebrew-US English (bilingual)
    I was in an American university a very long time ago, but it seems to me that I enrolled in the university (was accepted as a student) and then each term had to register for classes.
     

    kuleshov

    Senior Member
    Spain Spanish
    It's a bit confusing. Perhaps both terms mean the same more or less. When I went to university I applied to study at a university; I was accepted, and then I had to enrol on the courses I was interested in. But according to your posts what I did was to enrol -applied-and then I registered for the courses.

    I must admit I've never learnt how to tell one term from the other!!!
     

    gasman

    Senior Member
    Canada, English
    Perhaps different faculties at university attract different usages. In the faculty I attended, in the long ago, we had a fixed course, attended the main lectures as a class, but for the the smaller groups, more on the practical side, we enrolled in the group we preferred or were accepted into, while we registered annually in the main faculty. I suppose the variations in usage are just a matter of semantics and not of substance.
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    When I applied to enter the university (we use the article in AE), I did so through the office of the registrar. After I was accepted, I registered for classes.

    ... and so it goes.
     

    screenactorsguild

    Senior Member
    Vietnamese
    How about this sentence:
    As well as breaking the law, Mark discovered he had a talent for singing and .........(enrolled, entered,joined,enlisted) at the Royal Northern College of Music after leaving Oxford.
    Why it has to be "enrolled" (I chose "enlisted" and my teacher said it was wrong)?
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    How about this sentence:
    As well as breaking the law, Mark discovered he had a talent for singing and .........(enrolled, entered,joined,enlisted) at the Royal Northern College of Music after leaving Oxford.
    Why it has to be "enrolled" (I chose "enlisted" and my teacher said it was wrong)?
    If you look up "enlist" in a dictionary, the reason that it is wrong should be pretty obvious to you. http://www.wordreference.com/definition/enlist
     

    Sun14

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    When I applied to enter the university (we use the article in AE), I did so through the office of the registrar. After I was accepted, I registered for classes.

    ... and so it goes.
    I was wondering how to say the other way around regarding "I did so through the office of the registrar".

    "Every year the office of the office need to recruit students at the beginning of the year."

    I made up this sentence. I was wondering whether recruit is acceptable.
     
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