enrolled <> who are enrolled

< Previous | Next >

Bigtime

Senior Member
Arabic
From Arthritis magazine:

"This free, confidential online screening tool from the National Council on Aging helps older adults and people enrolled in Medicare find programs that can save them money on prescriptions, health care, food , and more.

In a previous, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study, 50% of participants receiving a monthly 50-milligram dose of injected golimumab and 60% of participants receiving a 100-mg dose experienced a 20% or greater improvement in their AS after 24 weeks."

======
I am assuming that the author of the article wants to say:

"This free, confidential online screening tool from the National Council on Aging helps older adults and people who are enrolled in Medicare find programs that can save them money on prescriptions, health care, food , and more.

In a previous, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study, 50% of participants who are receiving a monthly 50-milligram dose of injected golimumab and 60% of participants who are receiving a 100-mg dose experienced a 20% or greater improvement in their AS after 24 weeks."

1. From my understanding that we can omit relative pronoun if the verb in continuous form, can we omit the relative pronoun with past verb as well as in the above context "who are enrolled"
If relative pronoun wasn't omitted, would that make the sentence clumsy?

Thanks
 
  • HumbleUser

    Member
    Russian - Russia
    I think the author uses "enrolled in Medicare" and "receiving ..." as adverb phrases, so he doesn't need to turn them into dependent clauses.
    btw, I also think he wanted to say "programs that can save their money" :)
     

    e2efour

    Senior Member
    UK English
    A noun can be followed by a gerund-participle (which I will call below by its traditional name of participle). The participle may be present or past.
    Examples:
    People living in glass houses should not throw stones.
    Patients enrolled in clinical trials may have their expenses paid.

    In both cases the participle modifies the noun before it.

    If it helps you, you can think of the sentences as "People who are living" and "Patients who are enrolled", i.e. a noun plus a relative clause. However, there is no relative pronoun in the sentences I have given.

    I don't know whether this clarifies anything for you. :)
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top