Ensuring + subject + verb

heybach

Member
Spanish
Hello everyone,

I'm updating my CV and one of the activities I carried out was:

- Ensuring the day-to-day operations run smoothly.

Is it correct?

What about this?:
- Ensuring the day-to-day operations to run smoothly.

Thanks in advance!
 
  • Cenzontle

    Senior Member
    English, U.S.
    Doesn't it sound a little informal to use "that" when I'm just listing tasks in my CV?
    (Did you mean "formal"?) I strongly advise you to use "that".
    Without it, there is a moment when the reader thinks you ensured the operations.
    The use of "that" is optional, but it's advisable when the subject of the following clause could be mistaken for the object of the main clause.
     

    heybach

    Member
    Spanish
    (Did you mean "formal"?) I strongly advise you to use "that".
    Without it, there is a moment when the reader thinks you ensured the operations.
    The use of "that" is optional, but it's advisable when the subject of the following clause could be mistaken for the object of the main clause.
    No, I meant "informal". By nominalizing a sentence (avoiding verbs and relative clauses) it sounds more formal, at least that happens in Spanish and German.
    So, if I had to nominalize my example, it would be something similar to:
    Ensuring the smooth run of day-to-day operations.

    But no idea if that sounds good... :)
     

    Cenzontle

    Senior Member
    English, U.S.
    Ensuring the smooth run of day-to-day operations.
    This is not bad. I probably would say "running".
    If I understand correctly, you are referring to something like the (formal, business-correspondence) Spanish "Pido que me informen..."
    (Although we are supposed to stay in "English Only" in this section of the Forum.)
    In English it seems to be the reverse: the use of "that" is more formal.
     

    heybach

    Member
    Spanish
    Thanks @Cenzontle.

    That's not exactly what I mean. Using "that" in English is more formal than avoiding it, as you said. I totally agree with that. However what I mean by "nominalizing" is, with an example:
    1. I have to take care that the students arrive early. --> "arrive" is used as a verb and is conjugated.
    2. I have to take care of the early arrival of the students. --> the noun "arrival" is used to express the same avoiding the verb.
    2 sounds much more formal to me while 1 is what I would avoid when writting a CV, for example. What do you native speakers think?
     
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