entailed the estate on his sons

WestFevalia

Senior Member
French - France
I'm translating a text about the Middle Ages. It explains that a nobleman entailed his estates on his eldest son and on his youngers sons.
Does it mean that the estates were divided into two parts, one for the eldest son and the other shared between the others?
 
  • Enquiring Mind

    Senior Member
    English - the Queen's
    Hello WestFevalia, I don't think it's possible to determine from the phrase "entailed his estates on his eldest son and on his youngers sons" in what fashion or proportions the estates were entailed. There would have to be a more detailed explanation to be able to make a judgement on this.
     

    WestFevalia

    Senior Member
    French - France
    Hello, this is an excerpt of the text (from Yorkshire Journal, 1882):

    "Lepton is a township in the parish of Kirkheaton …… A considerable estate at Lepton came to the Everinghams from the heiress of Birkin snd William Elys chev. (knight of the shire 1390) had this with Joan, the elder co-heir of that baronial house. Robert Elys, esq., mentioned above was their son, but though most of his lands went to his sister's heirs, the Lepton estate reverted to a surviving branch of the Everinghams. Robert Elys, however, while in possession seems to have granted lands in Lepton to his kinsman Richard Elys who in 8 Hen. V, entailed them on his sons, Richard, John, Robert and William. In 1316, Lepton appears to have been demesne of the honor of Pontefract."

    In a commentary on this text, it is said that Richard entailed his estates on his eldest son and his youngest sons, as if the said entails were different (maybe a more important one for the eldest son?)
     

    Enquiring Mind

    Senior Member
    English - the Queen's
    Difficult to know without seeing the commentary. From the text provided, I understand that Richard Elys entailed the lands on his four sons. If the commentary said Richard entailed his estates on his eldest son and his youngest sons, this doesn't tell us anything about the proportions of the entailment. The commentator may be suggesting that it was unusual for someone to entail lands to all four of his sons if, for example, the custom at the time was to entail estates only to the eldest son, and not the others.

    We cannot deduce anything at all about the proportions in which the lands were entailed from the information supplied here.
     

    christelleny

    Senior Member
    French-France
    "to entail" signifie donner un bien en héritage de façon à ce que ce bien reste dans la famille de l'héritier de génération en generation et ne puisse pas, par exemple, être vendu ou transmis à un enfant illégitime. D'après Wikipedia, le système français le plus proche aurait été la substitution héréditaire.

    Dans votre contexte, on pourrait utiliser : a fait de ses fils ses héritiers "in tail" (en incluant au besoin une explication).
     
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