entertain a visit

cecillian

Senior Member
Georgian
Hi, I checked all the options for entertain. Now I don't know whither a phrase like" visit an entertain from" means to think of visiting some one or accepting the invitation of some one or just some one coming to visit us?
Our Present. We were deeply honored to entertain a visit from HIs Grace, Bishop Joseph on this important occasion in the life of our parish. His Grace, accompanied by Subdeacon Michael Habib, stayed in our community from late Friday evening through our feast day luncheon after Divine Liturgy on Sunday. After meeting with various individuals throughout the day on Saturday (including a luncheon with the clergy of Saint James.
http://www.antiochianladiocese.org/news_090107_10.html
Thanks in advance
 
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  • Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    I think it an odd use of "entertain". The writer means "host", or he might simply have used "have".
     

    cecillian

    Senior Member
    Georgian
    I think he is saying that he was so happy because Bishop went and visited him. Right? But in a very formal way something from the Renaissance age.
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    The misuse of entertain here is that you entertain a person, not a visit.

    We were honoured to entertain the Bishop on his visit ...
    We were honoured to host a visit by/from the Bishop ...
    We were honoured to have a vist by/from the Bishop ...

    Whichever they use, it was a great pleasure, and an honour, to have the Bish come to see them. It's not old-fashioned.
     

    cecillian

    Senior Member
    Georgian
    Andygc thank you. But after the comments I looked for more "entertain a visit from". I found other examples. So maybe if it's not old fashioned, can we say people sometimes use it in an ironic way?

    . Wide receivers coach Matt Lubick will entertain a visit from Lauderdale after the new year in what could be a huge stepping stone to gain a serious look from the up-and-coming receiver.
    http://fishduck.com/2013/12/recruiting-update-2015-class-on-the-horizon/
    And even not in these sentences can we say there is something ironically using it?
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    This is a newsletter written by a volunteer from a small church that meets in a strip mall. It's basically a blog post that the person hopes will be read by a few of the church's members. It's not professionally edited. We all make mistakes. On Sunday, I made a post with the word "wrong" in it when I meant "right". Try not to get obsessed with random things you find on the internet. ;)
     

    cecillian

    Senior Member
    Georgian
    Yes Miss Julie, but here other people, seemingly are visiting for the speaker. So how can I say he was entertaining a visit from me? I can not know what is he/she thinking of.
     

    DonnyB

    Sixties Mod
    English UK Southern Standard English
    I think they probably mean "We were deeply honored to entertain His Grace, Bishop Joseph..." because the rest of that paragraph in the article you've linked to is an account of the various functions he attended during the course of his visit.
     
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