Entitlement meeting

Puellam audiam

Senior Member
Taiwanese, Mandarin
Hi, guys!

Please first read the following sentences:
'After the bloody Entitlement meeting I had to tell Johnson and Miss Flour they've been made redundant because of the financial cuts, and then after I was told that the Computer Department is going to do next year's timetable and I don't have to bother, the Vice-Principal sends a memo to say there's a glitch in the programme or something and I 've had to do it myself.'


The context seems to be in a school faculty.
I already check forun dicctionary on the word "entitlement." Yet still I would to ask what do those faculty staff do in a "Entitlement meeing"?

Thanks for your attention!:)
 
  • MissFit

    Senior Member
    I think that in this case entitlement means tax money that is given to the school by the government. They were told at the meeting that less entitlement money will be forthcoming, so Johnson and Miss Flour will be losing their jobs.

    Because of the use of the word bloody, it is obvious that this is British English. I'm from the U.S., so I may have it all wrong.
     

    mjscott

    Senior Member
    American English
    Hi, guys!

    Please first read the following sentences:
    'After the bloody Entitlement meeting I had to tell Johnson and Miss Flour they've been made redundant because of the financial cuts, and then after I was told that the Computer Department is going to do next year's timetable and I don't have to bother, the Vice-Principal sends a memo to say there's a glitch in the programme or something and I 've had to do it myself.'


    The context seems to be in a school faculty.
    I already check forun dicctionary on the word "entitlement." Yet still I would to ask what do those faculty staff do in a "Entitlement meeing"?

    Thanks for your attention!:)
    Unless someone else chimes in who has specific knowledge, I can help you with when I've most heard the word entitlement. It is used in our school setting when they are discussing benefit packages--insurance benefits, personal leave days, vacation days, sick leave, etc. Usually in the US, these are harsly thrashed out meetings at the end of the school year between school administration and the teacher's union. It seems as they are finishing out their fiscal year, this definition also fits the time frame in your original quote.

    This is also the time of year when teachers or assistant teachers get their "pink slips"--as they have a better handle on how many students they will have in the following school year. Besides knowing their budget from the government, they make cuts at that time to staff--due to budget cuts.
    Good luck!
     

    Puellam audiam

    Senior Member
    Taiwanese, Mandarin
    I think that in this case entitlement means tax money that is given to the school by the government. They were told at the meeting that less entitlement money will be forthcoming, so Johnson and Miss Flour will be losing their jobs.

    Because of the use of the word bloody, it is obvious that this is British English. I'm from the U.S., so I may have it all wrong.
    You are right that this is a British text.
    It comes from a novel of Tom Sharpe.
    But let me ask you, you can judge it is British English only from ¨bloody¨?
    Don´t Americans use it in a similar case?
    Then what will you say instead of ¨bloody¨?
    :p

    Thanks for your kind attention.
     

    Puellam audiam

    Senior Member
    Taiwanese, Mandarin
    Unless someone else chimes in who has specific knowledge, I can help you with when I've most heard the word entitlement. It is used in our school setting when they are discussing benefit packages--insurance benefits, personal leave days, vacation days, sick leave, etc. Usually in the US, these are harsly thrashed out meetings at the end of the school year between school administration and the teacher's union. It seems as they are finishing out their fiscal year, this definition also fits the time frame in your original quote.

    This is also the time of year when teachers or assistant teachers get their "pink slips"--as they have a better handle on how many students they will have in the following school year. Besides knowing their budget from the government, they make cuts at that time to staff--due to budget cuts.
    Good luck!
    Sorry to be so annoying!
    But when you say ¨(in our)school setting¨ what does it mean? And also why do you use ¨package¨ when you say ¨benefit packages¨?
    And ¨harshly thrashed out (meeting)¨?

    The problem is I come from Asia, some of those expressions you use just don´t seem natural to me.

    Thanks for all!:eek:
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    You are right that this is a British text.
    It comes from a novel of Tom Sharpe.
    But let me ask you, you can judge it is British English only from ¨bloody¨?
    Don´t Americans use it in a similar case?
    Then what will you say instead of ¨bloody¨?
    :p

    Thanks for your kind attention.
    I think I'm pretty safe in saying that Americans only say "bloody" when imitating Brits (and usually do a very bad job of it at that.) :) From other threads here I've learned that it's a much stronger word than most Americans take it to be. (But this is heading into the subject of another thread. I'd suggest posting another question regarding "bloody".)
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top