Entre comillas

Maddi

Senior Member
Spain , Spanish
Hi,

I want to know which is the English expression used with the meaning of "entre comillas".

Imagine that I want to say:

"Ahora estoy de vacaciones, con lo cual tengo tiempo libre, bueno, tiempo libre entre comillas, pues no paro desde que me levanto hasta que me acuesto."

So, my question is how to say that "entre comillas"?

Thanks a lot.
 
  • Alex5

    Senior Member
    Spanish and Catalan
    También puede ser "inverted commas". Pero deberíamosinvestigar si existe una equivalencia en inglés para decir que se refiera a que está de vacaciones "pero a medias, no del todo".

    Espero haber ayudado.

    àlex
     

    Danim74

    Senior Member
    Spanish, Spain
    Yo diría (suena más natural en inglés...:

    I'm on holiday now, so I have some free time, well, allegedly, because I am busy all day!

    Si quieres decir lo que ha dicho otra persona entonces sería "quote, unquote".
     

    Paul Clancy

    Senior Member
    Ireland, English
    In Ireland we would say inverted commas

    for example

    I was on "holiday" ... note the inverted commas! or rather I was supposedly on holiday but ended up checking my emails and answering my work mobile phone so regularly that I might as well have been at the office. I was plagued by work for the whole time I was officially on leave.

    Quotation marks is also correct but my preference would be for the words "inverted commas" instead in a situation such as you outline.

    Un saludo
     

    fuzzzylogix

    Senior Member
    aspacameur/english 1st, spanish 2nd
    También puede ser "inverted commas". Pero deberíamosinvestigar si existe una equivalencia en inglés para decir que se refiera a que está de vacaciones "pero a medias, no del todo".

    Espero haber ayudado.

    àlex

    Sorry...never "inverted commas". Cuando dices algo entre comillas es porque se dice sarcásticamente. Tengo tiempo libre, entre comillas. Lo que está diciendo es que no tiene tiempo libre...o si lo tiene, son ratos libres aunque esté de vacaciones.

    En inglés se dice: I have free time, in quotation marks.
     

    trevorb

    Senior Member
    UK: English
    Sorry...never "inverted commas". Cuando dices algo entre comillas es porque se dice sarcásticamente. Tengo tiempo libre, entre comillas. Lo que está diciendo es que no tiene tiempo libre...o si lo tiene, son ratos libres aunque esté de vacaciones.

    En inglés se dice: I have free time, in quotation marks.

    In the UK, we might say:
    • I was, quote, "on holiday"
    • I was, open quotes, "on holiday"
    • Iwas "on holiday", unquote
    But I think more often we signal it by intonation rather than words, or by a (rather irritating, in my opinon!) gesture with two fingers of each hand indicating the quote marks.

    Such a remark may be said to be 'in quotes'.

    Hope that helps,

    Trevor.
     

    fenixpollo

    moderator
    American English
    But I think more often we signal it by intonation rather than words, or by a (rather irritating, in my opinon!) gesture with two fingers of each hand indicating the quote marks .
    I agree that the idea of "entre comillas" is more often expressed with intonation. Many people still hold up the index and middle fingers of each hand and flex them simultaneously as they stress the words that are "in quotes", but for many people, this gesture has become passé, corny, dumb, outdated, silly and/or pretentious.

    However, to answer the question about which words to use, I use or hear the following:
    I have some, quote, free time, unquote.
    I have some quote-unquote free time.
    I supposedly have some free time.
    Maddi said:
    Ahora estoy de vacaciones, con lo cual tengo tiempo libre, bueno, tiempo libre entre comillas, pues no paro desde que me levanto hasta que me acuesto
    Right now I'm on vacation, and with that I have some free time, well, free time in quotes, because I never stop, from the time I get up to the time I go to bed.

    The italicized words in these examples are stressed in speech with intonation, to indicate the quotation marks around them.

    Saludos.
     

    Paul Clancy

    Senior Member
    Ireland, English
    In the UK, we might say:
    • I was, quote, "on holiday"
    • I was, open quotes, "on holiday"
    • Iwas "on holiday", unquote
    But I think more often we signal it by intonation rather than words, or by a (rather irritating, in my opinon!) gesture with two fingers of each hand indicating the quote marks.

    Such a remark may be said to be 'in quotes'.

    Hope that helps,

    Trevor.

    I agree .. it is something that is said and not really written ... and yes Trevor, the gesture annoys me too.
     

    Paul Clancy

    Senior Member
    Ireland, English
    Sorry...never "inverted commas". Cuando dices algo entre comillas es porque se dice sarcásticamente. Tengo tiempo libre, entre comillas. Lo que está diciendo es que no tiene tiempo libre...o si lo tiene, son ratos libres aunque esté de vacaciones.

    En inglés se dice: I have free time, in quotation marks.

    I beg to differ, in Ireland we would not say IN QUOTATION MARKS ... it is a forced way of speaking ... we would say QUOTE UNQUOTE if we were to use the quote word. In Ireland we use inverted commas so you are misguided and incorrect fuzzylogix with the "never" comment ... because it is frequent in Ireland!!! and used in the way you describe. Asi que cuidado con lo de NEVER/NUNCA!!
     

    Paul Clancy

    Senior Member
    Ireland, English
    I wanted to clarify for fuzzylogix ... the words "inverted commas" can be used in speech or written in full (ie the words INVERTED COMMAS) in text to imply sarcasm
    inverted commas are also used to denote spoken words in a text

    Example

    "mind you own business" she said
    This is the normal use of inverted commas above

    When inverted commas are used in written text or spoken to denote sarcasm such as
    I told her I was on "holiday" .... if this were spoken you would say
    I told her I was on holiday quote unquote
    I told her I was on holiday in inverted commas


    Hope this clarifies fuzzylogix ... quote unquote and inverted commas ... both can be used in Maddi's context
     

    fuzzzylogix

    Senior Member
    aspacameur/english 1st, spanish 2nd
    I wanted to clarify for fuzzylogix ... the words "inverted commas" can be used in speech or written in full (ie the words INVERTED COMMAS) in text to imply sarcasm
    inverted commas are also used to denote spoken words in a text

    Example

    "mind you own business" she said
    This is the normal use of inverted commas above

    When inverted commas are used in written text or spoken to denote sarcasm such as
    I told her I was on "holiday" .... if this were spoken you would say
    I told her I was on holiday quote unquote
    I told her I was on holiday in inverted commas


    Hope this clarifies fuzzylogix ... quote unquote and inverted commas ... both can be used in Maddi's context

    Could have fooled me...as far as I know, the punctuation marks ("") are called quotation marks and not inverted commas. In normal speech, you "quote" what somebody else said. According to Jim, and I quote, "John's a loser." You never say, According to Jim, and I inverted commas, "John's a loser."

    Or as fenixpollo said, According to Jim, John's a loser quote unquote.

    Anyway, as you say, it is frequently used in Ireland. But make no mistake, you won't hear that anywhere in the US, Canada, Sweden (I'm assuming) or all of English speaking Asia including the chinese that speak english - and there's quite a few of those.

    So what do you guys call an apostrophe? A single inverted comma??????
     

    Paul Clancy

    Senior Member
    Ireland, English
    Could have fooled me...as far as I know, the punctuation marks ("") are called quotation marks and not inverted commas. In normal speech, you "quote" what somebody else said. According to Jim, and I quote, "John's a loser." You never say, According to Jim, and I inverted commas, "John's a loser."

    Or as fenixpollo said, According to Jim, John's a loser quote unquote.

    Anyway, as you say, it is frequently used in Ireland. But make no mistake, you won't hear that anywhere in the US, Canada, Sweden (I'm assuming) or all of English speaking Asia including the chinese that speak english - and there's quite a few of those.

    So what do you guys call an apostrophe? A single inverted comma??????

    I am not going to pick up on the tone of your comment however I will make a number of points:
    (a) your sentence .... According to Jim, and I inverted commas, "John's a loser." ... is not correct English ... "According to I" is incorrect. The Irish would not say it like this and neither would anyone who speaks English correctly. I agree we would use "quote, unquote" in such a scenario but as I have said before, in general "quote/unquote" or "inverted commas" are used in the spoken form and look a little odd when written down.
    (b) linguistic differences exist in spoken and written English across countries where it is the main or national language. You have obviously only been exposed to the words "quotation marks" and are alarmed, it appears, to learn that they might have a different name elsewhere in the world. In Ireland we refer to quotation marks as inverted commas. An apostrophe is just that. I am well aware that other countries use the words quotation marks ... I was speaking about Ireland .. we know they are referred to as quotation marks abroad but in Eire we call them inverted commas and it is correct to do so.
     

    fuzzzylogix

    Senior Member
    aspacameur/english 1st, spanish 2nd
    (a) your sentence .... According to Jim, and I inverted commas, "John's a loser." ... is not correct English ... "According to I" is incorrect.

    Of course it is incorrect...but I never said it.
     

    heidita

    Banned
    Germany (German, English, Spanish)
    Sorry...never "inverted commas".

    I you are misguided and incorrect fuzzylogix with the "never" comment

    But make no mistake, you won't hear that anywhere in the US, Canada, Sweden (I'm assuming) or all of English speaking Asia including the Chinese that speak English - and there's quite a few of those.

    One should be really careful with the "never" word in any language.
    Are you speaking for all of those people? Well, that's what I call taking a mouth full! No offence. ;)
    Or as fenixpollo said, According to Jim, John's a loser quote unquote.


    Why would you use quote unquote here? No need for that at all. If it is according to John, it is quite clear you are quoting his opinion.

    So what do you guys call an apostrophe? A single inverted comma??????
    Do you think this sounds funny?:eek:
     

    fuzzzylogix

    Senior Member
    aspacameur/english 1st, spanish 2nd
    Do you think this sounds funny?:eek:[/quote]


    Nope...not at all. It was a legit question. If quotation marks are called inverted commas, then by logic, an apostrophe should be a single inverted comma.

    No humor intended there.
     

    heidita

    Banned
    Germany (German, English, Spanish)
    Nope...not at all. It was a legit question. If quotation marks are called inverted commas, then by logic, an apostrophe should be a single inverted comma.

    I lived in England and I always used and heard inverted commas. Actually, dictating, I always use inverted commas.

    open inverted commas----close inverted commas.

    There you are, fuzzy, make no mistake.:D..but you certainly will hear this in England.

    Look at this thread , too.
     

    Masood

    Senior Member
    British English
    I lived in England and I always used and heard inverted commas. Actually, dictating, I always use inverted commas.

    open inverted commas----close inverted commas.
    Yes, I agree. Although it's still widely used, I think it's more common now to hear in dictation "open quotes....close quotes".

    In UK English, there's a fixed expression 'in inverted commas' which is widely used here, conveying a sense of sarcasm or implying that this is not the whole truth.

    Here's a good example.

    I think in a grammatical/punctuation context, I'd always refer to them as quotation marks.
     

    fenixpollo

    moderator
    American English
    (a) your sentence .... According to Jim, and I inverted commas, "John's a loser." ... is not correct English ... "According to I" is incorrect.

    Of course it is incorrect...but I never said it.
    Yes, fuzzzy, you did say it. It's not Paul's sentence, it was yours, and I think that we can all agree that it's gramatically incorrect because "inverted commas" is not a verb.
    You never say, According to Jim, and I inverted commas, "John's a loser."
    Paul isn't saying that "inverted commas" is used used as a verb, in the same grammar structures as "quote-unquote"; but that it is a noun that describes the double-apostrophe used to make quotation marks.
     

    fuzzzylogix

    Senior Member
    aspacameur/english 1st, spanish 2nd
    Yes, fuzzzy, you did say it. It's not Paul's sentence, it was yours, and I think that we can all agree that it's gramatically incorrect because "inverted commas" is not a verb.


    Paul isn't saying that "inverted commas" is used used as a verb, in the same grammar structures as "quote-unquote"; but that it is a noun that describes the double-apostrophe used to make quotation marks.


    What I meant was, I didn't say "According to I". I did say inverted commas as a substitute of quote-unquote simply to exemplify how ridiculous it sounds. It was not meant to be read as a verb, but rather the way it is used.
     

    Paul Clancy

    Senior Member
    Ireland, English
    This thread is beginning to sound like a row!

    Thank you Fenixpollo, Masood, Heidita for adding to this debate and for supporting the "inverted commas" which fuzzylogix seems to have such a problem with. Fuzzylogix ... I am not surprised that Heidita asks about your "single inverted comma" question ... from the tone of the rest of your inputs it sounds like you are just being "smart" (in inverted commas!!)

    The English speaking world is a very big place as is the Spanish speaking world and as Heidita rightly observes, as I have earlier, one needs to be very careful in deciding that a particular expression or word is not correct just because one is not familiar with it. It is quite clear from the discussion that INVERTED COMMAS is also widely used in the UK as is quotation marks. In Ireland it would be more common to say inverted commas as I have remarked earlier. BOTH are correct.

    Heidita from the way you have presented your message by quoting comments of forum contributors it looks like the quote " But make no mistake, you won't hear that anywhere in the US, Canada, Sweden (I'm assuming) or all of English speaking Asia including the Chinese that speak English - and there's quite a few of those." was my contribution also ... just for the record it was not ... this was Fuzzylogix's comment not mine.
     

    rich7

    Senior Member
    Venezuela español
    Al refrerinos a un supuesto hecho en español utilizamos la frase "entre comillas" para indicar que existen dudas sobre algo. ejemplo:

    La gran ayuda humanitaria " " de los EEUU en Irak.

    Normalmente hablando sólo gestualizamos con los dedos para representar las comillas y así las dudas existente.

    ¿Tienen idea si los angloparlantes hacen algo similar????
     

    parhuzam

    Senior Member
    USA/English/Español
    Hola,

    Like we would also say "ditto" .... It means we do the same....

    Repito lo que dice rich7 "Normalmente hablando sólo gestualizamos con los dedos para representar las comillas y así las dudas existente."

    En gesto... sí... pero nunca lo he visto escrito.

    Spoken as little gringa says... written??
     

    parhuzam

    Senior Member
    USA/English/Español
    Hola,
    I misunderstood from his original example of using ... La gran ayuda humanitaria " " de los EEUU en Irak.
    The quotations marks have to encompass the selected word. I thought he was asking about leaving them floating.

    RE:"we also write "quote unquote?" If one would have to resort to writing them out, I think that would be a mark of a limited vocabulary...there are so many words to say questionable..... I wouldn't suggest to people learning English that it would be correct to write it.
    I prefer to promote your example " so-called " instead.

    Thank you for the address ...

    Saludos.
     
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