Entry-Level or Low-Level Staff

tievoli

Senior Member
P.R.China
Hi, could anybody tell me how to express the staff with the lowest grade in a company? Can I say base-line staff?
 
  • GenJen54

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    I like "entry-level" as I can't think of a suitable substitue, but I have to ask whether "entry level" is not usually reserved for those workers who are considered "green;" In other words, the newbies, the fresh meat, the ones just out of school taking that first step towards career greatness.

    Does the same hold true for someone who may still have a "low-level" job hierarchically, but may have seniority in terms of length of service to a company?

    For example:

    The secretary who has worked for X Corporation for 25 years.
    The janitor who has worked for Y Corporation from the time he was twenty. (He's fifty-five and nearing retirement.)

    Even though the positions may be considered entry-level, the people who hold those positions certainly are not.
     

    el alabamiano

    Senior Member
    English (US)
    GenJen54 said:
    I like "entry-level" as I can't think of a suitable substitue, but I have to ask whether "entry level" is not usually reserved for those workers who are considered "green;" In other words, the newbies, the fresh meat, the ones just out of school taking that first step towards career greatness.

    Does the same hold true for someone who may still have a "low-level" job hierarchically, but may have seniority in terms of length of service to a company?

    For example:

    The secretary who has worked for X Corporation for 25 years.
    The janitor who has worked for Y Corporation from the time he was twenty. (He's fifty-five and nearing retirement.)

    Even though the positions may be considered entry-level, the people who hold those positions certainly are not.
    That's why I decided on base-level, as entry-level means exactly as you say. One entry-level position at X company could, for example, begin at a scale of $10.00 per hr. with the high end being $20.00. Another entry-level position at the same company might be the lowest paying job within that company, say $6.00 per hr. and topping out at $9.00 per hr. Therefore, the $6.00-9.00 job will always be the base-level (basement-level) job, no matter what. So to me, tievoli is looking for base-level instead of entry-level.
     

    river

    Senior Member
    U.S. English
    GenJen54 said:
    I like "entry-level" as I can't think of a suitable substitue, but I have to ask whether "entry level" is not usually reserved for those workers who are considered "green;" In other words, the newbies, the fresh meat, the ones just out of school taking that first step towards career greatness.

    Does the same hold true for someone who may still have a "low-level" job hierarchically, but may have seniority in terms of length of service to a company?

    For example:

    The secretary who has worked for X Corporation for 25 years.
    The janitor who has worked for Y Corporation from the time he was twenty. (He's fifty-five and nearing retirement.)

    Even though the positions may be considered entry-level, the people who hold those positions certainly are not.

    At the beginning you are entry-level. Then you gradually gain seniority.
     

    James Stephens

    Senior Member
    English, USA
    In the expression line and staff, staff denotes non-administrative personnel. Try also non-administrative personnel, or staff (used either alone or with a modifier (secretarial, maintenance, ect.); workers alone or with a modifier (field, assemply-line)
     

    river

    Senior Member
    U.S. English
    Good point, James. But I know some companies offer entry-level positions paid on an hourly basis and entry-level professional positions. Both gain seniority based on review.
     

    James Stephens

    Senior Member
    English, USA
    An administrative (line) or staff position may be occupied by a new hire or by a veteran employee.

    I wonder if I have been responsive, however, to the question posed by tievo. He/she wanted the lowest, not the lower eschelon. That's harder. Perhaps more to the point, might be persons/positions assigned to the lowest pay grade.
     

    nycphotography

    Senior Member
    American English
    James Stephens said:
    In the expression line and staff, staff denotes non-administrative personnel.

    In AE staff = "non management" employees.

    Line workers suggest factory, or production work, where you have:
    Line -> team leaders -> supervisors -> managers -> executives

    Staff suggests office or administrative work where you have:
    Staff -> Managers -> executives

    Sometimes office work also includes:
    project lead(er)s
    project managers
    team lead(er)s
    between staff and managers.

    There are (many) more possibilities, but these cover the basics.
     

    James Stephens

    Senior Member
    English, USA
    nyc photography makes very valid observations. When I worked in personnel eons ago, before it was renamed human resources, I learned the terms as i defined them from my boss, a retired military man. The divisions so labled have always seemed counter intuitive to me. Maybe it is/was only used in the military. In the school district where I worked, anyone who supervised other employees was said to have a staff. That person himself was on somebody staff. The top administrators were identified as the superintendent's staff. In any case, the line-staff distinction I pointed out it is too esoteric to be helpful, even if valid. I withdraw the suggestion. It would be interesting to hear from some HR people with more recent experience in the field on this subject.
     
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