Envie (French), ganas (Spanish), feel like...

ThomasK

Senior Member
Belgium, Dutch
How would you express those expressions all referring to the English "feel like" [I feel like living to the full]? Especially: do you need "have" or can you use it? (Might be appropriate nowadays with C causing disruption...)

Dutch:
- "ik heb zin" (which by the way is the same word as "sense" and sometimes "directions" (in wijzerzin/ clockwise) [and even "sentence"])
- (Flemish variant) "ik heb goesting", which seems to be less abstract, more like a gut feeling, starting from the "belly", not the head or heart... ;-) -- it obviously refers to goût in French, gusta in Spanish, etc.

I just something like "siento ganas" or something the like [in a book by Ivan Illich], where this "ganas" seems to have a very specific meaning (reminding me of "goesting")...

French: envie - which oddly enough is a homonym of "envy" in French, though "envier" is only a verb, if I am not mistaken.
 
  • Dymn

    Senior Member
    In Catalan we also say "tinc ganes" like in Spanish, with the caveat that in the singular form it means hunger: "tinc gana" = "I'm hungry"
     

    symposium

    Senior Member
    Italian - Italy
    In Italian it's "avere voglia di...", from "volere" = to want" (io voglio = I want). It roughly means "to have a craving for...": "I feel like living to the full" = "Ho voglia di vivere la vita al massimo". "Aren't you going out tonight? I don't feel like it" = " Non esci stasera? Non ne ho voglia".
     

    ThomasK

    Senior Member
    Belgium, Dutch
    Just wondering:
    - could one say that ganas refers to the belly somehow? Like our goesting?
    - voglia < volere: where is the basis of your willpower? Would you have any idea? Is there any answer to that? Any hunch? [This is not a biological issue, just a question referring to metaphors that might point to what a native speaker might linguistically associate with the will…]
     

    symposium

    Senior Member
    Italian - Italy
    I don't think that "volere" or "voglia" are located anywhere in the body. There's no relation between "volere" and a body part in Italian.
     

    Welsh_Sion

    Senior Member
    Welsh - Northern
    Celtic languages traditionally (Breton has echoes owing to French influence, but otherwise it's non-existent in the other 5 extant languages) don't have a verb 'to have' so in order to express e.g. hunger, we have to say:

    Mae eisiau bwyd arnaf fi
    Is want food on me

    Further, 'eisiau' itself, although often glossed in English as 'to want', is actually a noun and not a verb. More modern usage with regard to 'hunger on-me',

    Dw i eisiau bwyd
    Am I wanting food
     

    ThomasK

    Senior Member
    Belgium, Dutch
    For sure, for sure. But sometimes you notice that people spontaneously refer to parts of the body, for example to the stomach, when having trouble digesting a blame or something. It need not be based on facts, it is just a habit in a culture....

    @Welsh_Sion: is wanting here like needing or wishing, I wonder?
     

    Circunflejo

    Senior Member
    Castellano de Castilla
    Tengo ganas.
    Siento ganas.
    Me entran ganas.
    Me dan ganas.

    As far as I know, it isn't related with any body part but it's of unknown origin so who knows!
     

    ThomasK

    Senior Member
    Belgium, Dutch
    But maybe: what is in your view the difference with "me gustas" (if I am not mistaken)? Is it stronger? I referred to goesting saying that it seems to be more physical, "felt", than the "abstract" sense...
     

    Circunflejo

    Senior Member
    Castellano de Castilla
    what is in your view the difference with "me gustas" (if I am not mistaken)?
    Me gustas=I like you. In order to relate gustar with tener ganas, you would need to use the conditional of gustar. For example: me gustaría tomar un helado (I would like to eat an ice cream). Tengo ganas de tomar un helado (I want to eat an ice cream).
     

    Circunflejo

    Senior Member
    Castellano de Castilla
    the ganas expression is stronger, I suppose.
    :tick:
    The difference with me gustas is mainly grammatical, or syntactic, I guess.
    Yes, but note that we are talking just about me gustaría. Me gusta tomar un helado means I like to eat an ice cream. Me gustó tomar un helado contigo means I liked to eat an ice cream with you. Just with the conditional (me gustaría), the meaning can be related with tener ganas.
     

    symposium

    Senior Member
    Italian - Italy
    Actually voglia is also a birthmark in Italian:
    Giulia ha una voglia a forma di fragola sul suo braccio.
    Giulia has a strawberry-shaped birthmark on her arm.
    That's because according to legend, if a pregnant woman craves (ha voglia) for a food and doesn't eat it, the baby is born with a birthmark the shape and colour of which are reminiscent of the food the mother was craving for. That's why we call it "una voglia (a craving)". I'm sure this legend can be found in many cultures.
     

    AndrasBP

    Senior Member
    Hungarian
    The Hungarian equivalent of 'ganas' or 'envie' is 'kedv', an old Hungarian word of uncertain origin.
    Its derivatives include 'kedvel' (v. like), 'kedves' (adj. kind) and 'kedvenc' (adj. favourite).

    Just like Welsh and Russian, we don't use the verb 'to have':

    Van kedved olvasni? = Do you feel like reading? / ¿Tienes ganas de leer?
    van = (there) is
    kedv = 'ganas'
    -ed = 'your' (possessive suffix)
    olvasni = to read
     

    Armas

    Senior Member
    Finnish
    Finnish:
    tehdä mieli lit. "to do mind", the syntax is weird here, but you can also say mieleni tekee lit. "my mind does"
    minun tekee mieli lukea lit. "of mine does mind to read" = "I feel like reading"
    mieleni tekee lukea lit. "my mind does to read"

    huvittaa "to amuse": minua huvittaa lukea lit. "[it] amuses me to read"
    haluttaa < haluta "to desire": minua haluttaa lukea lit. "[it] makes me desire to read"

    Some verbs with the causative suffix can have this sense. Huvittaa and haluttaa are formed with the causative suffix as well. For example tanssittaa "to make someone dance" can also mean "to feel like dancing", the verb is then used impersonally: minua tanssittaa lit. "[it] makes me dance".
     
    Some verbs with the causative suffix can have this sense. Huvittaa and haluttaa are formed with the causative suffix as well. For example tanssittaa "to make someone dance" can also mean "to feel like dancing", the verb is then used impersonally: minua tanssittaa lit. "[it] makes me dance".
    If I am not mistaken, something similar occurs with the Italian verb invogliare. Il bel tempo m'invoglia ad uscire/ mi fa venir voglia/ desiderare di uscire - Lovely weather makes me want to go out; I fancy going out in lovely weather...
     

    Welsh_Sion

    Senior Member
    Welsh - Northern
    I don't think it's like 'wishing'. Perhaps more like 'food is lacking to me' , so, ergo, 'I am hungry'. I don't think we often use expressions with 'wish' that often outside sending someone best (birthday) greetings or narrating that a genie in a lamp has given you three wishes.

    It's more common to feature the conditional of 'like': Hoffwn i (+SM) …. - I'd like ….

    As for 'I wish I were ….' the use of the subjunctive of the verb to be or the equivalent of 'it would be better if ...'
     

    Circunflejo

    Senior Member
    Castellano de Castilla
    Doesn't it just come originally from the verb "ganar"and then it morphed?
    The DRAE quotes it as unknown origin. Some sort of link with ganar sames likely but the origin of ganar isn't fully clear either. Maybe in the EHL forum there's someone with more knowledge about the subject.
     

    merquiades

    Senior Member
    English (USA Northeast)
    @Circunflejo This here site says ganar is a word of Gothic origin and originally meant to covet, so gana is covetousness. That would actually make gana's origin very similar to envie's origin "to envy"/ "to covet" with a similar contemporary change in meaning towards "to feel like": Tengo ganas de llorar/ J'ai envie de pleurer.
     

    Penyafort

    Senior Member
    Catalan (Catalonia), Spanish (Spain)
    There was also gairnei in Gothic, meaning 'desire, longing', to which the English verb yearn is clearly related.
     

    ThomasK

    Senior Member
    Belgium, Dutch
    And so funny: it has to do with hunting, grazing, etymologically! We still say: "we winnen energy". It is something like (trying to) harvest, that intention, I guess, which is also based on yearning, envie, etc....

    I don't think it's like 'wishing'. Perhaps more like 'food is lacking to me' , so, ergo, 'I am hungry'. I don't think we often use expressions with 'wish' that often outside sending someone best (birthday) greetings or narrating that a genie in a lamp has given you three wishes.
    Can one say: "food is wanting"? (I guess so but I am not sure). As for wishing it generally has a egotistic aspect (wish for myself) and an altruistic one (I wish you...). Not in Welsh?
     
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