envies / désirs

Zarg

Senior Member
English - Canada
Folks,

The subject here in the original French is "a song." Is it safe to cancel out "envies" given it doesn't translate well into English, and the next phrase contains "désirs"?

Ses influences sont aussi nombreuses que ses interprètes, ses façons de s’arranger aussi diverses que les modes et les envies, ses couleurs aussi riches que ses désirs.


A song has as many influences as it does interpretations, with arrangements as diverse as its styles, conjuring as many colours as it does passions.
 
  • Downbow

    Senior Member
    English - USA/Canada
    Envie and désir do seem to be pretty much synonymous. If you've decided to deviate from the rhetorical structure of the French («ses influences... sont, ses façons... [sont], ses couleurs... [sont]»), then I suppose you could safely drop envies.

    But the French does say "its arrangements are as diverse as fashions and yearnings" - not necessarily "its", so you might want to take another look. Still, the statement seems more "gushy" than disciplined, and I admit I don't know how I would approach it.

    Also, interprètes would ordinarily be "performers."
     

    Zarg

    Senior Member
    English - Canada
    Yes, you're quite right about the "arrangements" bit, thanks. As for interprètes, there is a lengthy French phrase "Auteur-compositeur-interprète" which translates in English as "singer-songwriter," the "performer" being implied. That word would be awkward in this context ("as many influences as performers"), so I altered it. Appreciate the input.
     

    Downbow

    Senior Member
    English - USA/Canada
    In Quebec, in context, "auteur" alone is generally understood to mean "singer-songwriter." In your sentence "singer" would do - but I wouldn't suggest using it. Your sentence is one to wrestle with, as I don't need to tell you!
    Donald
     
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