Equally if not better known is the Venus de Milo

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celine713

Senior Member
Chinese
Hi, dear friends,please have a look at this:

Hesiod's reference to Aphrodite's having been born from the sea inspired the Renaissance artist Botticelli's famous painting of the goddess on a giant scallop shell. Equally if not better known is the Venus de Milo, a statue which lost its arms in ancient times.

I am lost in the red part, could you please analyse it for me(what kind of sentence pattern it is)? Thank you so much!:)
 
  • The MightyQ

    Senior Member
    English, Canada
    I think the problem is that the first sentence refers to the "known" quality of the painting almost as an afterthought. The fame is not stressed at all, so "equally[ ] known" makes us go back to read the preceding sentence to see what was really being referenced. Is that what Celine713 meant by "brusque"?
    So you might want to try something like
    "As famous as this painting is, the Venus de Milo [blah blah] is equally if not better known."
     

    Ecossaise

    Senior Member
    English
    Equally well - if not better - known is the Venus de Milo, a statue which lost its arms in ancient times.
     

    celine713

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    I think the problem is that the first sentence refers to the "known" quality of the painting almost as an afterthought. The fame is not stressed at all, so "equally[ ] known" makes us go back to read the preceding sentence to see what was really being referenced. Is that what Celine713 meant by "brusque"?
    So you might want to try something like
    "As famous as this painting is, the Venus de Milo [blah blah] is equally if not better known."
    Yeah, that's exactly why I said "brusque"in the previous thread, perhaps my using this word is a bit confusing...well, thank you, I get it now~:)
     
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