Equiproportionately????

Beldonado

New Member
Sueco, Suecia
In some articles I came across the word "equiproportionately". It was used in various sentences, e.g.:

"These regressions indicate that within countries, income of the poor on average rise equiproportionately with average income. This is equivalent to the observation that there is no systematic relationship between averrage income and the share of income accruing to the poorest fifth of the income distribution"


In my diccionary, the prefix equi- means equaly. To me it sounds like a tautology for something to be equaly proportional. In any case, the above quote doesn't make much sense to me since proportionality would certainly suggest a systematic relationship??? Can anyone help me on this? Am I misinterpreting the context or the meaning of the word?
 
  • Old Novice

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    The sense is that if the average income of all workers goes up 10%, so does the income of the "poor". An alternative possibility is that income distributions are becoming less equal, so that when the average worker's income goes up 10%, the income of the poor goes up 5% -- less than equiproportionately.

    Edit: Sorry, just noticed: Wecome to the forum, Beldonado.
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Welcome to WordReference Beldonado:)

    And what a strange word!

    I can't find it in my dictionary though it seems to be used in the world of economics.

    At first I thought it was a completely unnecessary and over-elaborated alternative to "in proportion". But on looking at some examples I'm not so sure. It seems to have Old Novice's first suggested meaning.
    In proportion to doesn't seem right.
    At the same rate as isn't right.
    Maybe it has a place after all:)
     

    Old Novice

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    And what a strange word!
    . . .
    Maybe it has a place after all:)

    Sorry about that. :( But it's a useful concept in economics, and one you will find in many articles in the professional literature. Our only redemption is that other professions also develop technical terms (or let's not hesitate, jargon) that enable ideas to be conveyed precisely. It's simply Beldonado's misfortune that he encountered this particularly ugly useful word from economics. :D
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Apology not required.
    It is yet another useful lesson in the "don't condemn words just because you can't find them in the dictionary and think you know better" class. I may not like the look of it, but at least it has the virtue of being comprehensible:p
     
    Top