erbette rosse

< Previous | Next >

tsoapm

Senior Member
English (England)
Hi,

I'm translating a menu (not really my forte) and I’m stuck with a few things, so I’ll ask you good people. Here’s one of the courses:

Zucchine ed erbette rosse

Literally, it seems as though it should be “red herbs”, but it doesn’t seem very convincing. I’ve never heard of a dish made with red herbs and I can’t find them used in cooking on google (even after taking out the results for Resident Evil!)

The image search results don’t look much like herbs either. I get rapa and barbabietola. I have an idea it might be stems of rapa, but I can’t find any confirmation. Does anyone have a clearer idea?

Thanks
Mark
 
  • Alessandrino

    Senior Member
    Italiano
    Although I quite enjoy cooking, this the first time I stumble upon this one. From a quick search on google, it seems that it's the regional name (Veneto) for barbabietola. So I'd go with beetroot.
    I know, it doesn't make any sense, but so it is!
     

    italtrav

    Senior Member
    English
    Although I quite enjoy cooking, this the first time I stumble upon this one. From a quick search on google, it seems that it's the regional name (Veneto) for barbabietola. So I'd go with beetroot.
    I know, it doesn't make any sense, but so it is!
    In the Emilia region, erbette rosse refers to bietola, which in AE is chard or Swiss chard.
    I should add that whether the term refers to the leaves or the bulb is highly variable (Google erbette rosse and look at the "Images for erbette rosse"). In this case, I'd suggest asking the restaurant directly.
     
    Last edited:

    tsoapm

    Senior Member
    English (England)
    it seems that it's the regional name (Veneto) for barbabietola. So I'd go with beetroot.
    In the Emilia region, erbette rosse refers to bietola, which in AE is chard or Swiss chard.
    I should add that whether the term refers to the leaves or the bulb is highly variable (Google erbette rosse and look at the "Images for erbette rosse"). In this case, I'd suggest asking the restaurant directly.
    Thank you both very much. I think I'll take italtrav's suggestion; it's complicated somewhat by the fact that the company is Emilian, but the menus all seem to involve foods from close to, and beyond, the NE border.
     

    Alessandrino

    Senior Member
    Italiano
    Thank you both very much. I think I'll take italtrav's suggestion; it's complicated somewhat by the fact that the company is Emilian, but the menus all seem to involve foods from close to, and beyond, the NE border.
    Yeah, it's the wisest thing you can do in this case. Ask them if they can show you one ;)
     

    italtrav

    Senior Member
    English
    Is it beet greens? They are often used as a replacement for Swiss chard or spinach.
    Ciao rrose.

    Strictly speaking, all of what we call chard is beet greens; both chard and beetroot are each subspecies of Beta vulgaris. Put slightly differently, there are multiple cultivars of the one plant, some grown primarily for their leaves, others for their root.
     
    Cari "amici", sono "modi di dire", parole e termini in uso nella tradizione popolare, i contadini di un tempo non possedevano i testi per chiamare e definire le piante con i nomi scientifici....mi spiace che tra poco nel mio blog posterò un'altra ricetta con le "erbette rosse"...
    Ah, mi presento: sono l'autrice del post "incriminato" ;)
     

    tsoapm

    Senior Member
    English (England)
    Ah, mi presento: sono l'autrice del post "incriminato" ;)
    Piacere. :) È bello sapere di aver provocato discussione?

    As for the translation, I'm not sure it makes a great deal of difference what part it is, at least in BE. Though it would make sense to the call the root "beetroot", and the leaves "beet leaves", it ends up sounding American, because we call the vegetable beetroot rather than beet. You find plenty of hits for "beetroot leaves" on google. :D
     

    Alessandrino

    Senior Member
    Italiano
    Cari "amici", sono "modi di dire", parole e termini in uso nella tradizione popolare, i contadini di un tempo non possedevano i testi per chiamare e definire le piante con i nomi scientifici....mi spiace che tra poco nel mio blog posterò un'altra ricetta con le "erbette rosse"...
    Ah, mi presento: sono l'autrice del post "incriminato" ;)
    Ciao! Quindi con "erbette rosse" ci si riferisce alla radice o alle foglie (bietola)?
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top