escalation from someone

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Agito a42

Senior Member
Source: Batman The Dark Knight Returns (2012), an animated film.

Anchorwoman: Kidnapping and murdering young children, a line even the Mutants hadn't crossed until now. Despite the family paying the ransom, the Mutants still took the boy's life. This marks a chilling escalation from a group many are already calling the worst criminals Gotham City has seen since the Joker.

Could you tell me what the meaning of the part in bold is, please?
 
  • Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    Up until this point, the Mutants had not kidnapped and murdered children. Now that they have, this is an escalation – a level above their previous actions. This is chilling, frightening.
     

    Agito a42

    Senior Member
    So it is not a general escalation in something (for example, violence, or how nasty criminals could be)? It just says that these particular mutants are now willing to go much farther than before, right?
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    It's just another way of saying: Russia and China call on the U.S., North Korea and South Korea to de-escalate.

    Call for <something> from <someone>.
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    It's in the first two paragraphs of the article. The gist of the headline is that Russia and China want the US and North and South Korea to calm down and stop threatening each other.

    The situation (first paragraph):
    Russia and China joined diplomatic forces on Tuesday and called on North Korea, South Korea and the United States to sign up to a Chinese de-escalation plan designed to defuse tensions around Pyongyang’s missile program. (this is the de-escalation)

    And this is how they suggest doing it (second paragraph):
    The plan would see North Korea suspend its ballistic missile program and the United States and South Korea simultaneously call a moratorium on large-scale missile exercises, both moves aimed at paving the way for multilateral talks.
     

    Agito a42

    Senior Member
    Yes, Copyright, I did read the article before asking. I just wanted to know if the headline by itself tells you the essence of what's going on. My guess was/is, Russia and China want US, DPRK, and ROK to de-escalate their confrontation, "stand down", move away from readiness for war, "climb down" to a lower REDCON level. Am I correct here?
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    It means to lower their aggressive language and possible preparation for conflict. The headline tells you this if you keep up with current events, because you know what's been happening – but if you read it after living in the woods for three months, or after not reading any news at all, you would have to read the article to know what the de-escalation is all about.
     

    Agito a42

    Senior Member
    It means to lower their aggressive language and possible preparation for conflict.
    Thank you, Copyright. That's exactly what I wanted to know.

    But let's go back to the first two examples, where the preposition 'from' goes with the "escalation":
    ...a chilling escalation from a group many are already calling...
    ...further rhetorical escalation from major US diplomatic figures.
    In #6, you said:
    this is an escalation in rhetoric by important US diplomatic people
    So, my question is, can I use 'by' instead of 'from' in these examples? Or is there a difference in the meaning?
     
    Last edited:

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    Yes, you can probably use "by." There's probably a slight difference that I don't want to think about now, but I see "from" as the lead-in to introducing the source: "Where is the trouble coming from?" "From the politicians."
     
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