escape vs. scape

Gloria Anzaldua

New Member
Spanish
Hello guys,

Could anyone be so kind as to tell me whether there is a significant difference between using scape or escape (both as a noun and verb)?

Thank you!

Gloria
 
  • Logos_

    Senior Member
    English - America
    In contemporary speech, scape is usually only heard in the phrase "scape goat." It is a shorter form of the word escape, or, in the case of scape goat, escaped. You will sometimes come across it in old books and poetry. Escape is the word to use in today's language.

    Scape also has some technical meanings in botany and entomology, but I think this is not really germane.
     

    Chez

    Senior Member
    English English
    There is no connection between the two words, except in antiquated English where 'scape (note the apostrophe) was sometimes used to mean 'escape' – presumably indicating the way the verb was pronounced.

    In fact, 'scape' hardly exists as a word at all. It is sometimes used (poetically) as a shortened form of 'landscape' or 'seascape',meaning 'view of the land or sea'.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    In contemporary speech, scape is usually only heard in the phrase "scape goat."
    According to etymonline, the "scape" in "scapegoat" was borrowed by Tyndale from "landscape" whose "-scape" is related to "-ship". We get "escape" whole from Latin. They aren't related.
     

    Logos_

    Senior Member
    English - America
    According to etymonline, the "scape" in "scapegoat" was borrowed by Tyndale from "landscape" whose "-scape" is related to "-ship". We get "escape" whole from Latin. They aren't related.
    OED: "mid 16th century: from archaic scape ‘escape’ + goat."

    The scapegoat is allowed to escape into the wilderness, carrying with it the sins of the community. The notion of escape is the whole point. Etymonline is entirely correct but they have a bad link to the wrong sense of scape. It's a simple error.
     
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    Logos_

    Senior Member
    English - America
    And furthermore from Merriam-Webster: The English scapegoat is a compound of the archaic verb scape, which means "escape," and goat, and is modeled on a misreading of the Hebrew ʽazāzēl (which is probably the name of a demon) as ʽēz 'ōzēl , "the goat that departs." More modern translations render scapegoat in this text as Azazel, but the misreading endured and has entered the lexicon.
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    Could anyone be so kind as to tell me whether there is a significant difference between using scape or escape (both as a noun and verb)?
    In what context did you find "scape" and what was the source?
    Currently, "scape" is obsolete.
     

    ain'ttranslationfun?

    Senior Member
    US English
    As Chez noted, "xxxscape" refers to a genre, or rather the subect, of a painting; in addition to the meaning of "scapegoat" noted above, it has come to mean "someone on whom the blame for something is laid, often unfairly", and a "scapegrace" is a reprobate; and "'scape" as a verb is probably best known in the quotation from Hamlet "Use every man after his deserts, and who'd 'scape a whipping?" (note the use of the apostrophe) - but Shakespeare wrote a while ago.
     
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