Espera con ansias el mañana

Mexico RV'er

Senior Member
English - USA
I have a question about using tomorrow as a noun. My sentence is "Estoy segura de que Juan espera con ansias el mañana." Why is it el mañana and not just mañana? Would it also be correct without the el? I realize it is being used as a noun rather than an adverb in this instance, but so it the sentence, "Mañana es martes." I hope someone can clear up my confusion. Thanks.
 
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  • Mexico RV'er

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    Thank you for your replies. I am slow to respond because we are traveling. You have cleared up much of my doubt, but I still wonder if the el is necessary or if mañana could stand alone in my sentence above. Is there a way to know when it is needed? I also appreciate gengo's note about "anxiously" carrying a negative connotation in Spanish. I never realized that. I would have equated it with "eagerly." Again, thanks.
     

    gengo

    Senior Member
    American English
    I also appreciate gengo's note about "anxiously" carrying a negative connotation in Spanish. I never realized that. I would have equated it with "eagerly."
    Well, on second thought, the "con ansias" of your original very well could have a positive meaning, so I retract my previous note, as only the context can determine which meaning is intended. Sorry for any confusion.
     

    Mexico RV'er

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    Thanks gengo. And I think I have my other doubt figured out. Tell me if I'm wrong. Mañana without the article refers to the next day. Mañana with the article el refers to some future time and is used more figuratively: "Who knows what tomorrow will bring?" I don't literally mean tomorrow but rather something in the future. Am I on the right track?
     

    TheCrociato91

    Senior Member
    Italian - Northern Italy
    Mañana with the article el refers to some future time and is used more figuratively: "Who knows what tomorrow will bring?" I don't literally mean tomorrow but rather something in the future. Am I on the right track?
    I think you're right.

    Isn't "el mañana" similar to the literary/formal use of the English phrase "the morrow" (which means the following day but also, figuratively, the future)?

    Who knows what the morrow (= the future) will bring?

    morrow noun - Definition, pictures, pronunciation and usage notes | Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary at OxfordLearnersDictionaries.com

    See also: Morrow | Definition of Morrow by Lexico
     

    Amapolas

    Senior Member
    Castellano rioplatense
    Thanks gengo. And I think I have my other doubt figured out. Tell me if I'm wrong. Mañana without the article refers to the next day. Mañana with the article el refers to some future time and is used more figuratively: "Who knows what tomorrow will bring?" I don't literally mean tomorrow but rather something in the future. Am I on the right track?
    Yes, you're on the right track. This is what Agró meant by the (near) future in the first reply. :)
     

    Rocko!

    Senior Member
    Español - México
    I have a question about using tomorrow as a noun. My sentence is "Estoy segura de que Juan espera con ansias el mañana." Why is it el mañana and not just mañana? Would it also be correct without the el? I realize it is being used as a noun rather than an adverb in this instance, but so it the sentence, "Mañana es martes." I hope someone can clear up my confusion. Thanks.
    Es que si le quitas el artículo a la frase y no agregas más complementos, todo deja de tener sentido:
    "Estoy segura de que Juan espera con ansias mañana." :cross::cross::cross:
     

    Mexico RV'er

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    You are right, Amapolas, about the comment made by Agró and the near future, but at the time I first read it, it struck me as an odd way to mention "tomorrow," but it didn't register that he was talking about it in a broader sense. As I thought about that and reread my sentence, it occurred to me that is probably what el mañana meant.

    The other problem is that my sentence could easily be interpreted to mean some future event and not the next day. However, what I was trying to say was "I am sure Juan is looking forward to tomorrow," and obviously I didn't achieve that. I used espera con ansias to mean "is looking forward to." What would be a better way to handle this? Thanks.
     

    gengo

    Senior Member
    American English
    The other problem is that my sentence could easily be interpreted to mean some future event and not the next day. However, what I was trying to say was "I am sure Juan is looking forward to tomorrow," and obviously I didn't achieve that. I used espera con ansias to mean "is looking forward to." What would be a better way to handle this?
    Ah, so you are translating from an English sentence. That would have been super helpful to know at the outset. I thought you were analyzing the Spanish sentence you gave.

    As you surely know, "to look forward to" is hard to translate, because there is no directly corresponding Spanish phrase that is used as frequently as the English version is. You can say "esperar con mucha anticipación/ilusión," etc., but I rarely hear natives say that.

    I think you would have to reword the sentence, mentioning what exactly will happen tomorrow. For instance, "Estoy segura de que Juan está muy emocionado [de hacer lo que sea] / [porque podrá hacer lo que sea] mañana." A NSS can give you better options if you tell us what Juan is looking forward to doing tomorrow.
     

    Amapolas

    Senior Member
    Castellano rioplatense
    about the comment made by Agró and the near future
    Note that Agró wrote (near) in between brackets. I suppose his point was that it doesn't necessarily mean long ahead, which is right.
    Juan is looking forward to having a catheter removed following surgery. :)
    There is no 'tomorrow' in your sentence. :confused:
    As Gengo explained, esperar con ansias would be a translation trying to convey 'look forward to' but in most cases it just wouldn't work.
    One possible translation for this sentence might be 'Juan espera que le saquen / que le puedan sacar el catéter después de la cirugía'. In my idiolect.
     

    gengo

    Senior Member
    American English
    Note that Agró wrote (near) in between brackets. I suppose his point was that it doesn't necessarily mean long ahead, which is right.
    There is no 'tomorrow' in your sentence. :confused:
    I think she means that Juan had surgery at some point in the past, and tomorrow the doctor will remove the catheter, which surely will be a relief to Juan.

    By the way, these are brackets: [ ]
    These are parentheses: ( )
    These are braces: { }
     

    Mexico RV'er

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    Yes, the surgery was over and for several days he had a catheter. He was finally going to get it out. He was really looking forward to that! I just expressed it rather poorly. I appreciate all the help.
     

    Amapolas

    Senior Member
    Castellano rioplatense
    Yes, the surgery was over and for several days he had a catheter. He was finally going to get it out. He was really looking forward to that! I just expressed it rather poorly. I appreciate all the help.
    If the sentence does include 'tomorrow', as in 'Juan is looking forward to having a catheter removed following surgery tomorrow', one translation might be 'Juan espera que le saquen el catéter mañana después de la operación'. Also 'que mañana después de la operación le saquen el catéter' and other variants.
    By the way, these are brackets: [ ]
    These are parentheses: ( )
    These are braces: { }
    Yes, well... actually 'brackets' is an umbrella word for all three, and if you want to be more specific these are [] square brackets. Looked it up in the dictionary about twenty years ago for confirmation. :)
     
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