Esperanto: Yes/no questions

Status
Not open for further replies.

m_k_h

New Member
Finnish
Saluton,

I'm a bit unsure about my translation exercises. (These are from the self-study course kurso dot com dot br.) Could someone check if these are correct?

1. Does your father collect postage stamps?
Ĉu via patro kolektas poŝtmarkojn?

2. Did the son forget the milk?
Ĉu la filo forgesis la lakton?

3. Are the children eating sandwiches?
Ĉu la infanoj manĝas sandviĉojn? (Verb form?)

4. Does a healthy boy drink milk?
Ĉu sana knabo trinkas lakton?

5. Will the father wash the small cups?
Ĉu la patro lavos la malgrandajn tasojn?

6. Did the new (female) teacher forget the book?
Ĉu la nova instruistino forgesis la libron?

7. Do they sell tea and coffee?
Ĉu ili vendas teon kaj kafon?

8. Does the sick daughter write badly?
Ĉu la malsana filino malbone skribas? (Is the word order correct?)

9. Are they good friends?
Ĉu ili estas bonaj amikoj?

10. Does your brother sell books and newspapers?
Ĉu via frato vendas librojn kaj ĵurnalojn?


Dankon,
M.
 
Last edited:
  • Brioche

    Senior Member
    Australia English
    There are no errors.

    8. Does the sick daughter write badly?
    Ĉu la malsana filino malbone skribas? (Is the word order correct?)

    Word order in Esperanto is reasonably flexible.
    Here are some other correct ways of saying the same thing:
    Ĉu la malsana filino malbone skribas?
    Ĉu la malsana filino skribas malbone?
    Ĉu skribas malbone la malsana filino?
    Ĉu la filino malsana skribas malbone?
     

    m_k_h

    New Member
    Finnish
    Dankon! What about this "is doing sth" vs. "does sth", are both expressed the same way? E.g., can "infanoj manĝas sandviĉojn" mean both "children are eating sandwiches" and "children eat sandwiches"?
     

    Brioche

    Senior Member
    Australia English
    Dankon! What about this "is doing sth" vs. "does sth", are both expressed the same way? E.g., can "infanoj manĝas sandviĉojn" mean both "children are eating sandwiches" and "children eat sandwiches"?

    The English forms "[they] eat", "[they] are eating" or "[they] do eat" are usually simply manĝas in Esperanto - just as they would be simply [sie] essen in German, or [ils] mangent in French.

    However, Esperanto does have compound tenses, one of which is the present progressive. It is formed with esti + present participle.

    The present participle adds -ant- to the root form of the verb, thus "eating" = manĝ-ant-a.

    "La infanoj estas manĝantaj la sandviĉojn" = "The children are eating the sandwiches".

    Another possibility is the synthetic compound present progressive tense where the present participle is turned into a verbal root: La infanoj manĝantas la sandviĉojn.

    Note that these forms are not necessary in Esperanto.
    Most Esperantists are quite happy with the simple -as, -is, -os suffixes.
     

    m_k_h

    New Member
    Finnish
    Dankon denove! What about these sentences - ĉu ili estas korektaj? (Decided not to start a new topic since the Esperanto activity here doesn't seem to be very lively; didn't want to flood the forum with my topics...)

    1. What is this?
    Kio estas ĉi tio?

    2. Where is my cup?
    Kie estas mia taso?

    3. Which is my book?
    Kiu estas mia libro? (What is the difference between kiu and kio - when should we say kiu and when should we say kio? When it's a person, then kiu, but what about when it's a thing? Why don't we always say kio because all the nouns end with o?)

    4. Who ate my cake?
    Kiu manĝis mian kukon?

    5. When would you eat?
    Kiam manĝos vi?

    6. Everything is wet.
    Ĉiu estas malseka.

    7. I forgot everything.
    Mi forgesis ĉion.

    8. My book is somewhere.
    Mia libro estas ie.

    9. Then I drank my tea.
    Tiam mi trinkis mian teon.

    10. Who is that?
    Kiu estas tiu?


    M.
     

    Joca

    Senior Member
    Brazilian Portuguese
    Dankon denove! What about these sentences - ĉu ili estas korektaj? (Decided not to start a new topic since the Esperanto activity here doesn't seem to be very lively; didn't want to flood the forum with my topics...)

    1. What is this?
    Kio estas ĉi tio? :tick:

    2. Where is my cup?
    Kie estas mia taso? :tick:

    3. Which is my book?
    Kiu estas mia libro? :tick: (What is the difference between kiu and kio - when should we say kiu and when should we say kio? When it's a person, then kiu, but what about when it's a thing? Why don't we always say kio because all the nouns end with o?) (Kio means "what thing"; kiu means "which one" or "who".)

    4. Who ate my cake?
    Kiu manĝis mian kukon? :tick:

    5. When would you eat?
    Kiam manĝos vi? better: Kiam vi manĝus? or Kiam vi volas manĝi?

    6. Everything is wet.
    Ĉiu estas malseka. ĉio ...

    7. I forgot everything.
    Mi forgesis ĉion. :tick:

    8. My book is somewhere.
    Mia libro estas ie. :tick:

    9. Then I drank my tea.
    Tiam mi trinkis mian teon. :tick:

    10. Who is that?
    Kiu estas tiu? :tick:


    M.
     

    Brioche

    Senior Member
    Australia English
    3. Which is my book?
    Kiu estas mia libro? (What is the difference between kiu and kio - when should we say kiu and when should we say kio? When it's a person, then kiu, but what about when it's a thing? Why don't we always say kio because all the nouns end with o?)


    M.


    Kio does not necessarily refer to "things".

    For example:
    Li estas kiu? [Who is he?]
    Li estas Osmo Buller.

    Li estas kio? [What is he?]
    Li estas Ĝenerala Direktoro de UEA.
    Here the answer is a noun ending in -o
     

    Fred_C

    Senior Member
    Français
    Hi,
    used with people, "kiu" means "who", and it is a pronoun.
    Used with any noun designing a thing, "kiu" is an adjective instead, as such, it must be accompanied with its noun, and it means "which + noun".

    Kio is pronoun. It always replaces a noun. It cannot be used to express "what + noun", because this an English use of "what" as an adjective. In these cases, you must use "kiu".
     

    m_k_h

    New Member
    Finnish
    Dankon, now the kiu / kio thingy seems a bit clearer.

    How about these?

    1. How does she run?
    Kia kuras ŝi?

    2. What are you writing?
    Kion vi skribas?

    3. I am nobody's wife.
    Mi estas nenies edzino. (Is it also correct to say "Mi ne estas ies edzino"?)

    4. How did you do that?
    Kiel vi faris tion? (Is it more common to say "Kiel faris vi tion?")

    5. I am not that kind of girl.
    Mi ne estas tia knabino.

    6. We have all kinds of cups.
    Ni havas ĉiajn tasojn.

    7. What kind of sandwich do you have?
    Kian sandviĉon havas vi?

    8. What did you ask
    Kion demandis vi?

    9. Are they all dry?
    Ĉu ĉio estas sekaj? (Assuming we're not talking about people.)

    10. Who is that?
    Kiu estas tiu?

    Regards,
    M.
     

    Joca

    Senior Member
    Brazilian Portuguese
    Dankon, now the kiu / kio thingy seems a bit clearer.

    How about these?

    1. How does she run?
    Kia kuras ŝi? Kiel ŝi kuras? Kiumaniere ŝi kuras?

    2. What are you writing?
    Kion vi skribas? :tick:

    3. I am nobody's wife.
    Mi estas nenies edzino. :tick:(Is it also correct to say "Mi ne estas ies edzino"?) :tick:

    4. How did you do that?
    Kiel vi faris tion? :tick: (Is it more common to say "Kiel faris vi tion?") No.

    5. I am not that kind of girl.
    Mi ne estas tia knabino. :tick:

    6. We have all kinds of cups.
    Ni havas ĉiajn tasojn. :tick:

    7. What kind of sandwich do you have?
    Kian sandviĉon havas vi? Kian sandviĉon vi havas? But don't use "havi" in the sense of "to eat".

    8. What did you ask
    Kion demandis vi? Kion vi demandis?

    9. Are they all dry?
    Ĉu ĉio estas sekaj? Ĉu ĉiuj estas sekaj? (Assuming we're not talking about people.)

    10. Who is that?
    Kiu estas tiu? :tick:

    Regards,
    M.
     

    m_k_h

    New Member
    Finnish
    Dankon. Correction to the 1st sentence seems clear, but could someone clarify suggested corrections to sentences 8 (the same goes with the sentence 9) and 10. Which is the most widely used word order in questions including question word + subject + predicate, what about sentences including question word + subject + predicate + object? (Actually, in my native language, Finnish, the word order is as flexible as in Esperanto, but some choises make it sound old-fashioned, poetic, or otherwise weird.)

    And why ĉiuj, not ĉio in sentence 9? If we're talking about some objects, e.g., clothes or books? Or did I misunderstand the English sentence; does it mean "all people"?

    M.
     

    Brioche

    Senior Member
    Australia English
    Ĉu ĉio estas sekaj?:cross:

    ĉio is singular and sekaj is plural.

    Ĉu ĉio estas seka? = Is everything dry?
    Ĉu ĉioj estas sekaj? = Are they all dry? [not people]



     
    Last edited:

    Brioche

    Senior Member
    Australia English
    Dankon. Correction to the 1st sentence seems clear, but could someone clarify suggested corrections to sentences 8 (the same goes with the sentence 9) and 10. Which is the most widely used word order in questions including question word + subject + predicate, what about sentences including question word + subject + predicate + object? (Actually, in my native language, Finnish, the word order is as flexible as in Esperanto, but some choices make it sound old-fashioned, poetic, or otherwise weird.)


    M.

    There is nothing wrong in saying Kion demandis vi?

    I cannot say what the most widely used word order is.

    However, putting "Kion vi demandas" in Google got 52 hits, but "Kion demandas vi" got zero.

    Sometimes people will change the word order to allow more stress on a particular word. Some chose a word order because they like the rhythm.

    With this word order you can pause slightly before the stressed final word.
    Kion demandis vi?
    Vi demandis kion?
     

    m_k_h

    New Member
    Finnish
    Dankon, but now I'm even more confused about the correlatives :) Namely, the course I'm studying says "The correlatives ending in "o" ("kio", "tio", etc) cannot receive the plural ending "j", but can receive the accusative ending "n"."

    I googled a bit, and it seems that some sources do regard ĉioj as the plural of ĉio. Is there a controversy about this or is one of the two different opinions just plainly wrong? :)
     

    Brioche

    Senior Member
    Australia English
    Dankon, but now I'm even more confused about the correlatives :) Namely, the course I'm studying says "The correlatives ending in "o" ("kio", "tio", etc) cannot receive the plural ending "j", but can receive the accusative ending "n"."

    I googled a bit, and it seems that some sources do regard ĉioj as the plural of ĉio. Is there a controversy about this or is one of the two different opinions just plainly wrong? :)

    La respondo de Zamenhof

    Pri "ioj", "tioj", "kioj" k.t.p.

    Teorie la ĵus diritaj formoj tute bone povas havi multenombron tiel same, kiel ili havas akuzativon; sed en la praktiko mi ne konsilas al vi uzi la diritajn vortojn en multenombro, ĉar laŭ mia opinio ilia senco tion ĉi ne permesas. "Tio" prezentas ja ne ian difinitan objekton, sed ian bildon (aŭ abstraktan ideon), kaj bildo restas ĉiam ununombra sendepende de tio, ĉu ĝi konsistas el unu objekto aŭ el multaj.

    Tamen se aperas ia tre malofta okazo,
    kiam la logiko postulas, ke ni uzu la diritajn vortojn en multenombro, tiam la gramatiko de nia lingvo tion ĉi ne malpermesas.

    Ekzemple: «Lia potenco konsistas el diversaj ioj, el kiuj ĉiu aparte per si mem estas ne grava, sed ĉiuj kune donas al li grandan forton»

    From Lingvaj Respondoj.

    So Zamenhof disapproved of plural forms of -io words, although not categorically. He did not forbid them, but was of the opinion that plurality for those words was without meaning.
     

    m_k_h

    New Member
    Finnish
    Saluton,

    Ĉi tie estas novaj frazoj. Ĉu ili estas korektaj?

    1. I came by bicycle.
    Mi vidis per biciklo.

    2. I bicycled into San Francisco.
    Mi biciklis en San-Franciskon.

    3. I bicycled in San Francisco.
    Mi biciklis en San-Francisko.

    4. She ran on the grass.
    Ŝi kuris sur la herbo.

    5. She ran into the grass. (What does this even mean? Like into a pile of grass or to an area covered with grass?)
    Ŝi kuris sur la herbon.

    6. He ran behind the tree (he came from somewhere else).
    Li kuris malantaŭ la arbon.

    7. He smoked behind the tree.
    Li fumis malantaŭ la arbo.

    8. She traveled with a friend.
    Ŝi vojaĝis kun amiko.

    9. She wrote with a pencil.
    Ŝi skribis per plumo.

    10. He put the pencil under the paper.
    Li metis la plumon sub la paperon.

    Dankon,
    M.
     
    Last edited:

    Brioche

    Senior Member
    Australia English
    Saluton,

    Ĉi tie estas novaj frazoj. Ĉu ili estas korektaj?

    1. I came by bicycle.
    Mi vidis per biciklo. Mi venis bicikle. Mi venis per biciklo
    vidi = see

    2. I bicycled into San Francisco.
    Mi biciklis en San-Franciskon. [some people write it with a hyphen, and some do not, and some write Sanfrancisko]

    3. I bicycled in San Francisco.
    Mi biciklis en San-Francisko.

    4. She ran on the grass.
    Ŝi kuris sur la herbo.
    I think 'herbaro' would be better.
    I don't think she ran on one blade of grass!


    5. She ran into the grass. (What does this even mean? Like into a pile of grass or to an area covered with grass?)
    Ŝi kuris sur la herbon. = She ran onto the grass.

    Again 'herbaron' would be better.

    6. He ran behind the tree (he came from somewhere else).
    Li kuris malantaŭ la arbon.

    7. He smoked behind the tree.
    Li fumis malantaŭ la arbo.

    8. She traveled with a friend.
    Ŝi vojaĝis kun amiko.

    9. She wrote with a pencil.
    Ŝi skribis per plumo. per krajono, krajone.
    plumo = pen or feather

    10. He put the pencil under the paper.
    Li metis la krajonon sub la paperon.

    Dankon,
    M.
     
    Last edited:
    Status
    Not open for further replies.
    Top