Estonian: Assimilation of consonants after words that end in -e

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sakvaka

Senior Member
The Estonian version makes absolutely no sense at all. We say "Hernesupp!", which just means "Pea soup!" .
One small question: is there an assimilation of consonants in Estonian after words that end in -e*? Because in Finnish, we write "hernekeitto" but say "hernekkeitto". Thanks!

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  • hollabooiers

    Member
    Estonian
    One small question: is there an assimilation of consonants in Estonian after words that end in -e*? Because in Finnish, we write "hernekeitto" but say "hernekkeitto". Thanks!
    There seems to be assimilation of consonants with some vowels, laupäev (saturday) for example tends to become "lauppäev" and kullassepp (goldsmith) should be written kullasepp, but it has transformed because of assimilation. However, I can't think of a single word that ends with -e where the same thing would happen. For example you could never pronounce teekond (journey) as "teekkond" or lainehari (wave crest) as "lainehhari". I'm of course not 100% sure there aren't -any- words like that, but at the very least they must be extremely rare.

    This is actually really interesting. As far as I know, the reason why you guys assimilate in words that end with e is that your e is really short, herne for example almost sounds like herneh to Estonian ears, because the e gets cut off so quickly. In Estonian again e is never quite as short as that. But then again, neither are a, u and i and yet assimilation still does happen with those.

    We're getting really off topic here though. :D
     

    sakvaka

    Senior Member
    No more, since this is a thread of its own now. :)

    Thanks. In Finnish, the reason is the glottal stop at the end of the word. Laine, sade have originally been lainek and sadek, and as the k disappeared, the last vowel became short. In IPA, ['lɑi.neʔ] and ['sɑ.deʔ].

    This happens in the following words:
    1) verb imperatives and I infinitives
    2) particles that end -sti and -nne
    3) nouns that end in a short -e
    4) negative forms
    5) allative case; singular 3rd person posessive suffix...

    Usually with translative, too, but not with all speakers. When the next word begins with a consonant, this stop assimilates into it. With vowels, it becomes a double consonant stop.

    Pronounced: älä menes sinne, tänneppäin, sadekkausi, lainellauta, älä meneʔʔulos

    Anything familiar?
     
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