Estonian: personal pronouns

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jonquiliser

Senior Member
Svediż tal-Finlandja
Ok, it seems there are a number of people from Estonia here, so I hope some of you would want to help me a little more! I'd like to know the personal pronouns in Estonian, and if possible :eek:, their case declensions.

I (me, my, mine etc)
you
she, he, it
we
you
they

:D :cool: :)
 
  • halfminded

    Member
    Estonian, Estonia
    Ok, it seems there are a number of people from Estonia here, so I hope some of you would want to help me a little more! I'd like to know the personal pronouns in Estonian, and if possible :eek:, their case declensions.

    I (me, my, mine etc)
    you
    she, he, it
    we
    you
    they

    :D :cool: :)
    As noone else wants to reply and as I am wandering around on this forum anyway, then I`ll start...:D..and the others can carry on:)

    Nominative:
    I- mina/ma ( ma is just a shorter version of mina ( I know you were going to ask that;))]
    you- sina/sa
    he/she- tema/ta
    we- meie/me
    you- teie/te
    they- nemad/nad

    Genitive:
    my- minu/mu
    your- sinu/su
    his/her- tema/ta
    our- meie/me
    your- teie/te
    their- nende

    Partitive:
    me- mind
    you- sind
    him/her- teda
    us-meid
    you-teid
    them-neid
     

    halfminded

    Member
    Estonian, Estonia
    And I forgot to add ( my mind isn`t what it used to be:():

    it- see
    in genetive: selle
    in partitive: seda
     

    suslik

    Senior Member
    Estonia, estonian
    ok, because we have 14 declension types, then I can continue where halfminded ended...

    illative case:
    into me - minusse
    into you - sinusse
    into him/her - temasse
    into us - meisse
    into you - teisse
    into them - nendesse
    into it - sellesse

    inessive case:
    in me - minus
    in you - sinus
    in him/her - temas
    in us - meis
    in you - teis
    in them - nendes
    in it - selles

    elative case:
    out of me - minust
    out of you - sinust
    out of him/her - temast
    out of us - meist
    out of you - teist
    out of them - nendest
    out of it - sellest

    allative case:
    to me - minule
    to you - sinule
    to him/her - temale
    to us - meile
    to you - teile
    to them - nendele
    to it - sellele

    adessive case:
    on me - minul
    on you - sinul
    on her/him - temal
    on us - meil
    on you - teil
    on them - nendel
    on it - sellel

    ablative case:
    from me - minult
    from you - sinult
    from him/her - temalt
    from us - meilt
    from you - teilt
    from them - neilt
    from it - sellelt

    translative case:
    become me - minuks
    become you - sinuks
    become her/him - temaks
    become us - meieks
    become you - teieks
    become them - nendeks
    become it - selleks

    terminative case:
    until me - minuni
    until you - sinuni
    until her/him - temani
    until us - meieni
    until you - teieni
    until them - nendeni
    until it - selleni

    essive case:
    as me - minuna
    as you - sinuna
    as him/her - temana
    as us - meiena
    as you - teiena
    as them - nendena
    as it - sellena

    abessive case:
    without me - minuta
    without you - sinuta
    without him/her - temata
    without us - meieta
    without you - teieta
    without them - nendeta
    without it - selleta

    comitative case:
    with me - minuga
    with you - sinuga
    with him/her - temaga
    with us - meiega
    with you - teiega
    with them - nendega
    with it - sellega


    I hope I didn't do it too difficult for you...if you don't understand, just ask...
     

    jonquiliser

    Senior Member
    Svediż tal-Finlandja
    Now that is splendid, thank you so much!! :cool: I'll be trying to work it out, but much of it reminds of/seems to correspond with Finnish, so let's see how things go when I start to try and use it.. :eek: :D
     

    jonquiliser

    Senior Member
    Svediż tal-Finlandja
    Nüüd kui mõtlen, õliks veel mõned küsimus: do you use the pronouns always, or only to emphasise which person you are talking about? I ask because the abbreviated form (mina-ma, sina-sa etc) seems similar to the Finnish minä-"mä", but in Finnish, the second is colloquial, never used in formal contexts/writings. Often you don't use the pronoun (I live in Finland for example you say as "asun Suomessa"; if you mention the pronoun (minä asun...) you'd say it in contrast to "you live in Estonia (as one example) or to just otherwise emphasise, for some reason, that I am the one living here or there. Is this the same way in Estonian? How then about the negations? As the negation word doesn't conjugate to person, do you have to include the pronoun? Example (tell me which are correct, if you don't mind :):

    Räägin eesti keeld
    Ma räägin eesti keeld
    Mina räägin eesti keeld
    Ei räägi eesti keeld
    Ma ei räägi eesti keeld
    Mina ei räägi eesti keeld

    Aitäh :cool:
     

    suslik

    Senior Member
    Estonia, estonian
    Nüüd kui mõtlen, oleks veel mõned küsimused: do you use the pronouns always, or only to emphasise which person you are talking about? I ask because the abbreviated form (mina-ma, sina-sa etc) seems similar to the Finnish minä-"mä", but in Finnish, the second is colloquial, never used in formal contexts/writings. Often you don't use the pronoun (I live in Finland for example you say as "asun Suomessa"; if you mention the pronoun (minä asun...) you'd say it in contrast to "you live in Estonia (as one example) or to just otherwise emphasise, for some reason, that I am the one living here or there. Is this the same way in Estonian? How then about the negations? As the negation word doesn't conjugate to person, do you have to include the pronoun? Example (tell me which are correct, if you don't mind :):

    Räägin eesti keelt
    Ma räägin eesti keelt
    Mina räägin eesti keelt
    Ei räägi eesti keelt
    Ma ei räägi eesti keelt
    Mina ei räägi eesti keelt

    Aitäh :cool:
    well, in my opinion, it's not so informal to use pronouns. I think, it's different than in Finland, because it depends on context what to use. For person whose mother language is not Estonian, it's difficult to know what to use, but if you talk with Estonian people, they understand you anyway:) But mostly we use pronouns. So if you want to be right on most times, use pronouns.
    About those examples, best way to say is Ma räägin eesti keelt and Ma ei räägi eesti keelt. Other ways may seem just weird to Estonian people:) They are not wrong, but they don't fit to this context.
    I can make some examples too:

    I don't love you - Ma ei armasta sind
    We went to Paris - Me läksime Pariisi
    I'm always happy - Ma olen alati õnnelik
    I don't eat fish - Ma ei söö kala
    I like to swim - Mulle meeldib ujuda
    I don't understand - Ma ei saa aru

    Those are the example sentences where you would always use pronouns, even when you are writing an essay. So in Estonian we use most of the times pronouns. Feel free to use them:D
     
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