Etre enclin à ...

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Vengy

Member
France
Hello,

I am not sure if I have translated correctly the notion of "être enclin à".
Here is the context and the translation :

Yet, it is a utopia to think that such a deal is always possible. We all know that companies’ aim is to outclass their competitors; within this context their goal is to reduce their costs. Consequently, they are less and less inclined to conclude fair deal.

Cheers
 
  • Ian Tenor

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Hello,

    I am not sure if I have translated correctly the notion of "être enclin à".
    Here is the context and the translation :

    Yet, it is a utopia to think that such a deal is always possible. We all know that companies’ aim is to outclass their competitors; within this context their goal is to reduce their costs. Consequently, they are less and less inclined to conclude fair deal.

    Cheers


    Hello, Vengy -

    My reply is a bit late perhaps : but "better late than never", as they say !


    You might consider one or two possible alterations to your translation which will make it sound more natural ::

    It would be utopic / idealistic, however, to think such a deal always possible (1). We all know that the aim of companies (2) is to beat / their competitors / the competion / and that, given this, their goal will always be to cut costs. Consequently, they will be less and less / inclined to / willing to / / conclude / finalize / agree a fair deal. ... OR ... prone to finalizing a fair deal (3).


    (1) Yes, this is OK : it involves a subjunctive, and is the simplest way of reducing the number of words.

    (2) this better than companies' aims : I don't really know why, but in certain case it is best to avoid the genitive in "s", preferring the genitive in "of". The famous "restaurant menu" is brought to mind : "Lamb's Shoulder" in the English translation of 'épaule d'agneau' instead of the correct, but surprising perhaps, "Shoulder of Lamb" !

    (3) The previous correspondent must excuse me, but I feel that "prone to" implies an automatic response rather than a reasoned one, more appropriate, perhaps, to the context you give. A question of taste, probably.

    Best to you -

    Ian
     
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