Etymology: Earth

Testing1234567

Senior Member
Cantonese
You "obviously" know what he does think? What I got from his this word "I will not entertain the Turkic words (yir etc.) by commenting on them." is that he probably has no idea, has no knowledge about "Yir" and he just tried to hide his illiterate about this by "entertain" instead of saying simply "I do not know" that is a must to be said by a person with an academic approach that he showed some sign of it when commenting on other forms of "earth".
What I said was equivalent to the comment that the argument relating "yir" to "earth" is not even wrong, so berdnf interpreted it correctly.

I didn't (try to) establish any relation, but, their sounds (pronounciations/phonetics) of "Yir/Yer/Jir/etc" and "Earth/Erd/Erde/Eretz/etc" are not far from each others even if they are not very close to each others. (consonants here "y/j/etc" in "yir/yer/jir/etc" are not emphasized when they are pronounced. So, you may hear them as if "ir/er/etc"
Please refer to what I said earlier: Anyone can find similarities in a set of words. However, not everyone can derive a productive rule from the correspondences in order to prove that those words are really related.

This is the step missing, from a pseudo-linguistic theory to a proper linguistic theory: testing your hypothesis.
 
  • garipx

    Member
    turkish
    What I said was equivalent to the comment that the argument relating "yir" to "earth" is not even wrong, so berdnf interpreted it correctly.
    You are missing a point here. What I am trying to do is not "relating yir to earth". If I do what it is done here (borrowing/loaning from this language, etc), it is better to say "earth" is related to "yir". Root is closer to simple "yir". Anyway, I am not saying "earth" comes from "yir" or "yir comes from earth" that's how people here are saying. What I am saying is "there is a relation between yir and earth and which comes from which is unknown." However, if you know, just say. Even by entertaining, can you make any ANY comment on "yir" ? I do NOT think so...

    As for your words about "similarities" , "pseude-theories", etc.. Wait a minute. Languages that are studied academically are not produced academically, often produced by totally illiterate people. So, what we are doing here is learning illiterate people productions. I for one who also lived among those totally illiterate people and also lived in high level science field by researching similarities/symmetries/invariants/etc in a complex field like chaos from pure theoretical math to experimental/practical can say this the language here we are talking is written language, for me, a symbolic mathematics, a small subgroup of general language group which is spoken language which is done by people whose majority is not academic at all. So, using academic arguments such as "similarity/pseudo/etc" does not work for me if you are subjective.

    Having said these also, now, please, entertain with "yir"... a simple word. Ok, you can make just a simple comment if you gave up entertainment.

    (if you don't know anything about "yir", your claim "there is no relation between yir and earth" is nonsense... logic tells this.)
     
    Last edited:

    rushalaim

    Senior Member
    русский
    I think, no matter what group of languages from the etymology of "land" came.
    Maybe, there was the Proto-language of agriculture, family and so on. For example, Estonian is PIE [ema] ("mother"), and Aramaic is Semitic [ima] ("mother").
    The same with "land". Greek [hora], Semitic [ara], Russian [or], because the root is AR.
     

    Testing1234567

    Senior Member
    Cantonese
    Estonian is PIE [ema] ("mother"), and Aramaic is Semitic [ima] ("mother").
    The same with "land". Greek [hora], Semitic [ara], Russian [or], because the root is AR.
    Estonian is Proto-Finnic *emä < Proto-Uralic *emä, not PIE.
    The Proto-Semitic word is *ʾimm- or *ʾumm-.

    I fail to find the Greek word you are referencing. Please provide the word in its native script.
    The reconstructed Proto-Semitic word is *ʾarṣ́- < Proto-Afro-Asiatic *ʔariĉ̣-.
    I also fail to find the Russian word.
    You can't just cut out letters and assert that the words are related.
     

    rushalaim

    Senior Member
    русский
    Estonian is Proto-Finnic *emä < Proto-Uralic *emä, not PIE.
    The Proto-Semitic word is *ʾimm- or *ʾumm-.

    I fail to find the Greek word you are referencing. Please provide the word in its native script.
    The reconstructed Proto-Semitic word is *ʾarṣ́- < Proto-Afro-Asiatic *ʔariĉ̣-.
    I also fail to find the Russian word.
    You can't just cut out letters and assert that the words are related.
    https://phys.org/news/2013-05-linguist-core-group-words-survived.html
    Estonian "mother" [ema] ema
    Aramaic "mother" [ima] אמא
    Greek "land" [hora] χώρᾳ
    Aramaic "land" [ara] ארעא
    Russian "plough" [or] ор
     

    Ihsiin

    Senior Member
    English
    Would anyone who has been following this thread be so kind as to summarize the questions asked in this thread which are still open?
    To answer this, any meaningful questions in this thread have long since been answered. What followed has been a long stream of effluent that doesn't bear attention.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top