Etymology of the Slavic male name PREDA

Zareza

Senior Member
Romanian
Hello!

I am for the first time here. Sorry if I make a mistake. I am interested in the etymology. There is a male name in Romanian, Preda, in nowadays only used like family name. I heard that it comes from Bulgarian language or it is a Slavic name. Could you help me with the etymology of this name? I searched on internet but nothing, just this:

прѐдан прил. devoted; faithful; loyal; attached; true-hearted; ваш ~ (в писмо) yours truly, yours faithfully; ~ син devoted/dutiful son

but I am not sure if it is correct.

Thank you!
 
  • francisgranada

    Senior Member
    Hungarian
    I can only say that the variants of the adjective "predan" exist in (perhaps) all the Slavic languages with various meanings (not only what you have cited). Originally it's a participle from the verb predati, composed from the prefix pre- and the verb dati (=to give). However, I don't know if the name Preda derives from this. (Intuitively I'd expect rather Predan in this case).
     

    Christo Tamarin

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    I cannot find any name like Preda or Predan in Bulgarian.

    However, there is Prodan and Prodana and Proda, meaning "sold-out", willing to say the new-born child is devoted to somebody else. In this context, there could be Preda or Predan meaning "предаден" "given" to somebody else.
     

    Zareza

    Senior Member
    Romanian
    Thank you! Your replies throw light on my question. The verbs a preda and a da (to give) exist in Romanian, for sure they come from Slavic. And also the name Prodan is used as a family name. Then, I searched for the name Prodan and I found the story of this name on a Moldavian site: it comes from the word продан (sold). In that article they said that there was a very old tradition among the Slavic people and Romanian people to change the name of a baby (when he was very ill) to send away the disease or the evil spirit or to cheat the death. The baby was symbolically sold to a woman who had healthy children. The mother could get the baby back after he received a new name, and the descendents of this child took this new name as a family name. This tradition is still mentioned at the end of the 19th century in the stories of a great Romanian novelist. // In conclusion, the participle prodan becomes a noun and then a name (He is a prodan (sold), then he is Prodan.)

    In another article I found that the name Prodan in fact came in Romanian from the Slavic people with the meaning child, toddler, that means it is a very old noun and its meaning changed. In the old documents it exists from the 15th century (probably because the written documents appeared in our teritory in that time), but could be older. It could mean that the Romanian Preda might be a changed form of Prodan, the letter n could easily disappear and the o changed.
    Thank you!
     

    francisgranada

    Senior Member
    Hungarian
    ...The verbs a preda and a da (to give) exist in Romanian, for sure they come from Slavic ...
    The verb a da without prefix in Romanian - in my opinion - is rather the continuation of the Latin dare (of Indo-European origin).
    ...Then, I searched for the name Prodan and I found the story of this name on a Moldavian site: it comes from the word продан (sold). In that article they said that there was a very old tradition among the Slavic people and Romanian people to change the name of a baby (when he was very ill) to send away the disease or the evil spirit or to cheat the death. The baby was symbolically sold to a woman who had healthy children. The mother could get the baby back after he received a new name, and the descendents of this child took this new name as a family name ... In conclusion, the participle prodan becomes a noun and then a name (He is a prodan (sold), then he is Prodan.)
    This is really interesting.
     

    Zareza

    Senior Member
    Romanian
    francisgranada: The verb a da without prefix in Romanian - in my opinion - is rather the continuation of the Latin dare (of Indo-European origin).

    Yes, you are right. Thank you.
     
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