Evangelismos Hospital

Renavere

Member
Lithuanian
Hello, in the translation which I'm doing "Evangelismos Hospital" in Athens is mentioned. I gather that "Evangelismos" is a genitive form? Could you give me a nominative form of it? "The Hospital of...?"

My language also has a genitive, so I'm careful not to add two genitive endings.

Thank you so much!
 
  • velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    Officially, the full name of the hospital is:
    Γενικό Νοσοκομείο Αθηνών "Ο Ευαγγελισμός". It's nominative case.
    I'd translate it as "the Evangelismos Hospital".

    "They rushed him to the Evangelismos Hospital in Athens."
     

    ioanell

    Senior Member
    Greek
    My language also has a genitive, so I'm careful not to add two genitive endings.
    Given that you expressed the same precaution in your thread "Fokionos Negri"
    (because in my language (Lithuanian) genitive inflections are also added, I'm afraid to add two inflections.), I think it would be interesting if you dedided to quote one or two examples of such a transfer and a "careless" translation containing two genitives in your language, making any necessary, helpful to us, comments. :thank you:
     

    Renavere

    Member
    Lithuanian
    Given that you expressed the same precaution in your thread "Fokionos Negri"
    (because in my language (Lithuanian) genitive inflections are also added, I'm afraid to add two inflections.), I think it would be interesting if you dedided to quote one or two examples of such a transfer and a "careless" translation containing two genitives in your language, making any necessary, helpful to us, comments. :thank you:
    Well, yes, I'm strugling a bit with Greek in this translation. For example, Patission Avenue I would naturally translate into Lithuanian as "Patisijono prospektas", but knowing (thanks to this great community, and I hope I understood correctly) that Patission is gentive of Patissia, I will now translate "Patisijos prospektas". As if in English someone decided to write Patission's Avenue instead of Patissia's Avenue, although it would be incorrect in English. And having never learnt Greek I have no clue about these forms.

    I will soon start proofreading my work and I think I will come back here with more questions.
     
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    Renavere

    Member
    Lithuanian
    Yes, but I think it would be odd to translate the name of the hospital if that's what you are suggesting.
    I agree with you, but on the other hand, if you, a Greek, were reading a novel full of Lithuanian names of streets and buildings, and came across a hospital name in Lithuanian, for example "He was taken to "Apsireiškimo" Hospital", wouldn't it be more comfortable for you to see the name in your native language, i.e. "Evangelismos" Hospital?
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    I would think it very strange to read in my native language (English), "They took him to Annunciation Hospital". Firstly, not very many English folk know anything about the Annunciation to the Blessed Virgin, and secondly if you look on any map of Athens printed in English, you will see it marked as "Evangelismos Hospital". In French I've seen l'Hôpital Général d'Atènes <Evangelismos>.

    It's an iinteresting question.
     

    Renavere

    Member
    Lithuanian
    I would think it very strange to read in my native language (English), "They took him to Annunciation Hospital". Firstly, not very many English folk know anything about the Annunciation to the Blessed Virgin, and secondly if you look on any map of Athens printed in English, you will see it marked as "Evangelismos Hospital". In French I've seen l'Hôpital Général d'Atènes <Evangelismos>.

    It's an iinteresting question.
    Thank you for your insights. There is something to think about. What to focus on in a work of fiction: preserving names of places as they are or sometimes translating them for the sake of the beauty of the text.
     

    Αγγελος

    Senior Member
    Greek
    It should also be mentioned that despite its name, Evangelismos Hospital is a regular secular hospital, part of the National Health System, not (say) one run by the Church or by nuns.
     
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