Even ''giovani d'onore'' have to be nominated

furtiva

New Member
Hi,
I would like to know how to translate the word ''even'' in the following sentense.

È raro che persone senza consanguineità con una famiglia mafiosa siano ammesse nella 'Ndrangheta. Even ''giovani d'onore'' devono essere nominati da un membro della 'Ndrangheta prima di entrare nell'organizzazione.

Would I be able to just translate it with 'anche' or does that imply that it it's rare also for ''giovani d'onore'' to enter?

Any help will be appreciated. Thank you.
 
  • rainbowizard

    Senior Member
    Italian - Italy
    Hi.
    It is not so clear if the original sentence is in English or Italian... anyway you can say "anche" for "even" without any risk of misunderstanding, I think :)
     

    furtiva

    New Member
    Sorry. I'm not really sure what it is that's unclear. I'll try again.

    I'm putting together a text abouth the 'Ndrangheta in Calabria. This is what I'm trying to write.
    "It's rare that persons without family-bonds to the mafia are admitted into the 'Ndrangheta. And even giovani d'onore (kids with a family-connection to the mafia) have to be nominated by a member before entering into the organisation."

    My attempt:
    È raro che persone senza consanguineità con una famiglia mafiosa siano ammesse nella 'Ndrangheta. Ed anche ''giovani d'onore'' devono essere nominati da un membro della 'Ndrangheta prima di entrare nell'organizzazione.

    But when I showed this to my Italian professor he thought that I ment that it's also rare for giovani d'onore to become members. When, in fact, I wanted to express that even if you already have ''one foot through the door'' you still need a member to vouch for you.
    I just wanted to know if there is a better word to use instead of ''anche'', a word that wouldn't give that double-meaning.

    Am I making any sense now? I hope so. Maybe it's not as complicated as I think.:eek:
     
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