even given superior scores /, even given little task.

Julianus

Senior Member
Korean
Hello.

1a. The anxious are more likely to fail even given superior scores on intelligence tests, as a study of 1,790 students in training for air traffic control posts discovered.(Korea university entrace exma)

As there is the only noun--The anxious, we can surely know that the blue part modifies 'The anxious'. Then, as there is no comma before participial phrase, the blue part is an essential information. If I add an additional information, should I add comma before participial phrase like following?

1b. The anxious are more likely to fail, even given little task.

Thank you always~.
 
  • entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    This perhaps does not address the question of the comma, but there are two different uses of 'given' here. In the original sentence it's impersonal: no-one is being given anything. It is in fact a preposition (it has no subject, and need not be predicated of anything). In effect it's saying: Even in a (given/particular) situation where they have superior scores, the anxious are more likely . . .

    Your suggestion is using it as a past participle, so it's short for 'even when they (the anxious) are given a little task'. ('A' is needed.) However, in both versions the comma is just optional. I see no strong reason for preferring it in or out.
     

    George Washington

    Member
    Korean - Korea
    This perhaps does not address the question of the comma, but there are two different uses of 'given' here. In the original sentence it's impersonal: no-one is being given anything. It is in fact a preposition (it has no subject, and need not be predicated of anything). In effect it's saying: Even in a (given/particular) situation where they have superior scores, the anxious are more likely . . .

    Your suggestion is using it as a past participle, so it's short for 'even when they (the anxious) are given a little task'. ('A' is needed.) However, in both versions the comma is just optional. I see no strong reason for preferring it in or out.
    It has been a long time since you posted it. But I want to know if the sentence could be interpreted like: "and they are even given inferior(instead of "superior") scores on intelligence test ...

    I do understand your past participle exaplanation, but I wonder if my case could be possible.
     
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