even / still / yet

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Jessica2006

Member
English
<< Topic words: even / still / yet >>

Hi all, :eek: I'm a little confused about where these words are placed in a phrase. Can someone tell me if my assumptions are correct?
1. They are after the present tense
2. They are before the infinitif
3. After the auxiliary

Are thoes correct? And could someone give me some examples?
Thanks!
 
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  • Sabelotodo

    Senior Member
    English, United States
    There is no definite rule, except that I can't think of any case in which even, still, or yet would go immediately after an infinitive. Adverb position is usually flexible. It is a matter of personal style, except in some unusual cases where it may affect the meaning slightly. (An old drill sargent of an English teacher might disagree with me.) A lot of reading will help you be more comfortable with positioning adverbs in sentences. All of these examples are grammatically correct, but the first choice in each group sounds most natural to me.

    There is still a little ice cream in the freezer.
    There is a little ice cream in the freezer still.
    There is yet a little ice cream in the freezer.
    There is a little ice cream in the freezer yet.
    There is even a little ice cream in the freezer.
    There is a little ice cream in the freezer even. (This one is a little awkward, but not grammatically incorrect.)

    I still have to go to the post office.
    I have to go to the post office still.
    I have to go to the post office yet.
    I have yet to go to the post office.

    He was still talking when I left.
    He was talking still when I left.
    He was even talking when I left.
    He was talking even when I left.
    He was yet talking when I left. (The last two here sound archaic.)
    He was talking yet when I left.
     

    nelliot53

    Senior Member
    Spanish-[PR]; English-[US]
    Hi all, :eek: I'm a little confused about where these words are placed in a phrase. Can someone tell me if my assumptions are correct?
    1. They are after the present tense
    2. They are before the infinitif
    3. After the auxiliary

    Are thoes correct? And could someone give me some examples?
    Thanks!

    1. They are after the present tense:

    I am even considering it.
    She is still waiting.
    He is yet to be seen.

    2. They are before the infinitive

    He is still to be questioned.
    She says even to ask is dangerous.
    I am yet to begin work.

    3. After the auxiliary

    I am still going.
    She is even saying it.
    It could yet be a hoax.

    Hope these can still be of help!
     

    vitor boldrin

    Senior Member
    português brasileiro
    Hello everybody I am brazilian and I'd like know which them must I use in the end of phrases?
    still,even or yet?
     

    vitor boldrin

    Senior Member
    português brasileiro
    Okay
    I'm in my home still / yet / even.
    I'm practicing taekwondo at korean gym still/yet/even.
    He is on the way to the work still/yet/even.
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    Thank you. :)
    In all those examples, I would use 'still'. The position of still is flexible and it may be placed at the end of the sentence, as in your examples. However, normally I expect them to follow the verb:
    I'm still in my home.
    I'm still practicing taekwondo at the Korean gym.
    He is still on the way to the work.

    It is possible to use 'yet' to mean still, in the same positions, but it sounds slightly old-fashioned to me. However, we do use 'yet' with a negative statement, and in that use, it is often at the end of the sentence.
    I'm not in my home yet.
    I'm not practicing taekwondo at the Korean gym yet.
    He is not on the way to the work yet.


    We could also put yet after not, but this is the more formal or literary position.
    I'm not yet in my home.
    I'm not yet practicing taekwondo at the Korean gym.
    He is not yet on the way to the work.

    .
    The same pattern is possible for even in a negative context.
    I'm not even in my home.
    etc.

    You could say:
    I'm even practicing taekwando in a Korean gym.
    Or​
    I'm practicing taekwando in a Korean gym even.
    To me the second sounds less formal. It is something you may hear spoken more often than you will see it written, unless the writing is meant to imitate speech.

    I hope this was helpful.

    Added: Don't apologize for your English. It's fine. :)
    (But please remember that in English we capitalize nationalities. ;) )
     

    vitor boldrin

    Senior Member
    português brasileiro
    Cagey
    Thank you for answer
    I get scared to try to speak English
    I've already known that right way is using "still" after of to be verb but I had doubt about how use it if I could use it at the end of a phrase.
    I've also known "yet " must be placed at the end of a phrase from a negative answer and in the present perfect questions.


    for exemplo:


    Has he got a job yet?
    No,He hasn't got a job yet. - negative answer
    No,He still hasn't got a job - I think this sounds weird and unusual,what do you think about?

    Once again thank you very much buddy
     
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    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    It is possible and acceptable. :)

    On further reflection, I realize that I should have paid more attention to the difference in meanings between still and yet.

    "He still hasn't got a job" implies that he has been in need of a job for longer than the speaker would expect. It doesn't suggest where the fault lies, whether it is in his own lack of effort or in circumstances outside of his control, or in something else, but it often is used to introduce a criticism or complaint.

    'Yet'
    suggests that the speaker expects him to get a job in the future. In that sense, it often is more optimistic than 'still'.

    Some of this has been discussed in the posts above. You can also look at the threads on still yet for further discussion. :)
     

    WildWest

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    I was thinking of opening a thread over this subject, but now that someone did this, I'd like to ask something related to the grammatical suitability of the placement of the word even in a sentence.

    1) I know what you did. It's despicable even for you.
    2) I know what you did. It's despicable for even you.


    3) Some things are more powerful than even you.
    4) Some things are more powerful even than you.

    The first and the third are the original versions, which were taken from a TV series and the others are mine. Is it correct to change the place of the word even like that?

    P.S : I think the only difference is about where the emphasis would be on.
     
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    vitor boldrin

    Senior Member
    português brasileiro
    Okay I'll check the threads out.(is this correct written like this?)
    If I have some more doubt I'll ask to you
    the last question these sentences are they are possible?
    I think that they are unusual but in colloquial language is possible to speak them.
    Check them out.(is this correct written like this?)


    He hasn't got a job still.
    He hasn't got a job even.
    He even hasn't got a job.
    He hasn't still got a job.
    He hasn't even got a job.
    He yet hasn't got a job.


    what do you think them? and what do they mean for you?
    how do you understand /interpret them?
    if I made some grammatical mistake please you feel free and correct me.

    happy holidays my friend.
     

    Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    He hasn't got a job still. :cross:
    He still hasn't got a job. :tick:

    He hasn't got a job even. :cross:
    He even hasn't got a job. :cross:

    He hasn't still got a job. :(
    He hasn't even got a job. :tick:

    He yet hasn't got a job. :cross:
    He hasn't yet got(ten) a job. :tick:
     
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