even the nurse

takashimiike

Senior Member
italian
Buongiorno, l'autrice del romanzo che sto traducendo (americana, ma di origine colombiana) ricorda quando era solita cantare filastrocche alla zia dimessa dall'ospedale.

"When Tía Dora returned home to us between surgeries, I belted out the nursery rhymes I was learning at Holy Family Roman
Catholic School. I sang to her about farmers taking wives and a rat taking the cheese. Everyone in the nursery rhyme was grabbing
what did not belong to them, even the nurse, and then one afternoon the hospital arranged for a nurse to visit Tía in our
living room."

Dopo aver scritto dei contadini e del topolino, scrive che chiunque in queste filastrocche prendeva qualcosa che non gli apparteneva, even the nurse.

Ma cosa vuol dire la parte in grassetto? C'è forse un gioco di parole tra "nurse" e "nursery rhymes" che non riesco a cogliere?
 
  • Starless74

    Senior Member
    Italiano
    ...E siccome, subito dopo, un'infermiera fa davvero visita alla famiglia, probabilmente dalla zia (evidentemente non lucidissima, se la protagonista le cantava filastrocche per bambini) ci si aspetta un'associazione con l' "infermiera ladra" di cui alla canzone. :)

    Edit: unico possibile gioco di parole è tra: nurse della filastrocca, che può essere anche una "tata",
    e la vera nurse che invece è inequivocabilmente infermiera perché mandata dall'ospedale. Ma non cambia il senso generale.
     

    rrose17

    Senior Member
    Canada, English
    The nursery rhyme she's alluding to is "The Farmer in the Dell" where the farmer takes a wife, the wife takes a child, the child takes a nurse etc. It's also a game where everyone gets to choose someone to stand with them.

    Also there is no longer a connection between the words nursery and nurse. There are no nurses in a nursery. Perhaps in days long gone there may have been wet-nurses, women who had given birth and would breastfeed, or nurse, rich peoples' children.
     
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    takashimiike

    Senior Member
    italian
    The nursery rhyme she's alluding to is "The Farmer in the Dell" where the farmer takes a wife, the wife takes a child, the child takes a nurse etc. It's also a game where everyone gets to choose someone to stand with them.

    Also there is no longer a connection between the words nursery and nurse. There are no nurses in a nursery. Perhaps in days long gone there may have been wet-nurses, women who had given birth and would breastfeed, or nurse, rich peoples' children.
    Grazie mille per la filastrocca!!!
     

    theartichoke

    Senior Member
    English - Canada
    Also there is no longer a connection between the words nursery and nurse. There are no nurses in a nursery. Perhaps in days long gone there may have been wet-nurses, women who had given birth and would breastfeed, or nurse, rich peoples' children.

    No nurses in the sense of infermiere, but the word "nurse" was used for a woman employed to take care of small children well into the 20th century. The "nurse" in the nursery rhyme is clearly one of these. (Back in the days of wet-nurses, they used to be called "dry-nurses": I kid you not!)

    Incidentally, a Colombian-American child might well not realize that the "nurse" in the nursery rhyme isn't a hospital nurse....if this is where this story is going. She'd have had to have read rather a lot of 19th - 20th century British children's literature not to assume it's the modern American meaning of the word.
     
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    rrose17

    Senior Member
    Canada, English
    Arti of course is right. I was just thinking of Romeo and Juliet. There's a major character in the play known only as Nurse who looks after the teenage Juliet. So again the word nurse had plenty of uses other than what we know today as the medical one. And you're right any modern child I'd think, not just a Colombian-American one, wouldn't know the distinction.
     

    You little ripper!

    Senior Member
    Australian English
    https://core.ac.uk/download/pdf/159189643.pdf

    The term “dry nursing” is the direct opposite of wet nursing which means a trend where infants are fed with substances with the like of flour, bread or cereals prepared into a soup [3]. Dry nursing is a term used with regard to semi-liquid mixture [4] and it was originally introduced during the last couple of decades of the 17th Century by aristocrats and some gentry [3]. In the same period, foundlings and parish were sent to dry nurses who bottle-fed the infants [5] because of two reasons partly for necessity and taking into consideration the payment for dry nurses is cheaper than wet nurses [3, 6].
     

    theartichoke

    Senior Member
    English - Canada
    This is getting off topic, I fear, but from OED "dry-nurse," n.

    1. A woman who takes care of and attends to a child, but does not suckle it (opposed to wet nurse); formerly, also, in the general sense of ‘nurse’. at dry nurse (cf. nurse n.1 2a).
    a1616 W. Shakespeare Merry Wives of Windsor (1623) i. ii. 4 One Mistris Quickly; which is in the manner of his Nurse; or his dry-Nurse [1602 try nurse]; or his Cooke.
    a1618 W. Raleigh Instr. to Sonne ii, in Remains (1661) 84 After a while thou didst love thy Drie-nurse, and didst forget the other.
     
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