Every baby comes with a loaf of bread under his arm

blasita

Senior Member
Spain. Left four years ago
Hello.

Every baby comes with a loaf of bread under his arm.

This is a literal translation of a Spanish saying that means that a baby brings joy, etc., i.e. all kind of good things to the family when he's born.

I was wondering if a native speaker would ever say that phrase or a similiar one. If this would make sense at all with no context. Apparently it is used in American English.

Thank you.
 
  • Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Hi blasita:)

    I'm sorry, it means nothing to me. And I can't think of any equivalent saying in English:(.
     

    Language Hound

    Senior Member
    American English
    Apparently it is used in American English.
    Really? This is news to me!
    It sounds very strange--and even rather disgusting--to my American ear (I wouldn't want to eat that loaf of bread!).
    I can't think of any particular AE saying which would be similar in meaning to the Spanish saying.
    We do, though, often refer to a baby as "a bundle of joy."
     

    blasita

    Senior Member
    Spain. Left four years ago
    Hi Loob:). Many thanks. Cheers.

    Thank you, Language Hound, that helps a lot. I found some references in Google and also this thread. But I think all of them are non-native speakers.
     

    Language Hound

    Senior Member
    American English
    I just read through that thread in the Spanish-English Vocabulary Forum and also clicked on the three links revealing the use, in English, of
    "Every baby comes with a loaf of bread under his arm."

    As noted in that thread, it is not an idiom or even a saying in English.
    In the English-language articles that used it, one stated:
    There's an old saying that "every baby comes with a loaf of bread under his arm."
    Another stated: There’s a saying that “every baby comes with a loaf of bread under his arm.”
    And the third stated: When I called my mom to share, she reminded me of what my great-grandmother always said, “Babies are born with a loaf of bread under their arm.”

    When we say, "There's a saying..." or "There's an old saying...,"
    we don't necessarily mean "in English."
    Sometimes this is further clarified by saying;), for example:
    There's a Spanish saying... or There's an old Spanish saying...

    In the case of the great-grandmother, I can only assume that she was from a Spanish-speaking country.
     

    Bevj

    Allegra Moderata (Sp/Eng, Cat)
    English (U.K.)
    I think (as I mentioned in the thread you refer to) that it's a literal translation of the corresponding Spanish phrase and I have never heard it used in British English.
     

    blasita

    Senior Member
    Spain. Left four years ago
    Thanks for your contribution, Bev.
    As noted in that thread, it is not an idiom or even a saying in English.
    I'm so sorry, but I don't think this is true. At least it was not clear at all to me; I understood it was said that it could be an idiom/saying in AmE. Thanks again. Now I think it's clear this phrase is not a set phrase and there is not an equivalent in English either.
     
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    blasita

    Senior Member
    Spain. Left four years ago
    :confused: I'm confused. Are you saying that you still believe that it is an idiom or a saying in English?!!
    I don't think it's true it was all so clear in that other thread. If it had been, I would not have posted this thread in the English Only forum.
     

    Biffo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I don't think it's true it was all so clear in that other thread. If it had been, I would not have posted this thread in the English Only forum.
    Hello Blasita :)

    I have just read through that thread. The only native English speakers who answer seem to say that it isn't an English saying but a literal translation from Spanish. I must say I agree with them. Maybe I'll head over to that thread to carry on the discussion.
     

    xuliang

    Senior Member
    Chinese Mandarin
    Hi, everyone, I thought of a idiom "Every baby was born with a silver spoon in its mouth", which means the baby don't have to work hard. They already own a good fortune. Since you native speakers didn't think of this idiom, I am sure they are not silimar to your meaning, but to me, according to your meaning, the idiom is the same as yours.
     

    Language Hound

    Senior Member
    American English
    We didn't suggest "to be born with a silver spoon in one's mouth" because it does not mean the same thing.
    The OP says the Spanish saying "means that a baby brings joy, etc., i.e., all kinds of good things to the family when he's born."

    (Note that someone also thought of "to be born with a silver spoon in one's mouth" in the thread cited in post #4
    but quickly dismissed it because it doesn't mean the same thing.)
     

    Talmidhacham

    New Member
    English - USA
    This phrase is well known in Spain and came from there to the new world. It's origin may be Hebrew since Spain was the center of Judaism for centuries until 1498. The the exact saying is found in the Talmud, Niddah 35b "every child born brings his loaf of bread with him" The phrase is a metaphor, and it means that parents need not worry about the costs to feed and raise a child as God will provide the family with the means to take care of it. It is a beautiful saying and I can say with 6 grown kids that it was true for my wife and I, with Gods help.
     

    GreenWhiteBlue

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    This phrase is well known in Spain and came from there to the new world. It's origin may be Hebrew since Spain was the center of Judaism for centuries until 1498. The the exact saying is found in the Talmud, Niddah 35b "every child born brings his loaf of bread with him" The phrase is a metaphor, and it means that parents need not worry about the costs to feed and raise a child as God will provide the family with the means to take care of it. It is a beautiful saying and I can say with 6 grown kids that it was true for my wife and I, with Gods help.
    Nevertheless, this is not a common saying in English, whether American or British. < --- >


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