Every saint has a past, and every sinner has a future

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tanveerhrp

New Member
Hindi
Hello need the explanation of this phrase please,

Every saint has a past, and every sinner has a future I have not found its meaning in dictionary search also. thanks.
 
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  • reno33

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    Kindly let us know where you read or heard the sentence and provide us with some context.
     

    GreenWhiteBlue

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    This is a quote whose original context is usually overlooked, and as a result is typically assigned a meaning directly opposite to what it really means. The common misunderstanding is that saints (or good people) have sinned in the past, but have made use of God's forgiveness and have changed their lives, while sinners still have the opportunity to repent. This interpretation, however, is completely wrong. The quote actually comes from the third act of Oscar Wilde's play A Woman of No Importance, and it is a line spoken by Lord Illingworth. In the play, Lord Illingworth is a thoroughly amoral and dishonorable man, and in the context of the exchange in which the line appears, it is clear that Illingworth thinks that saints are fools for having given up lives centered on pleasure, while sinners -- whom he admires, and among whom he would count himself -- still have much more pleasure to look forward to. As expressed by Lord Illingworth, the sentiment comes across as smug, condescending, and unpleasant.
     

    tanveerhrp

    New Member
    Hindi
    This is a quote whose original context is usually overlooked, and as a result is typically assigned a meaning directly opposite to what it really means. The common misunderstanding is that saints (or good people) have sinned in the past, but have made use of God's forgiveness and have changed their lives, while sinners still have the opportunity to repent. This interpretation, however, is completely wrong. The quote actually comes from the third act of Oscar Wilde's play A Woman of No Importance, and it is a line spoken by Lord Illingworth. In the play, Lord Illingworth is a thoroughly amoral and dishonorable man, and in the context of the exchange in which the line appears, it is clear that Illingworth thinks that saints are fools for having given up lives centered on pleasure, while sinners -- whom he admires, and among whom he would count himself -- still have much more pleasure to look forward to. As expressed by Lord Illingworth, the sentiment comes across as smug, condescending, and unpleasant. pakistani.guru/web-hosting rentacar girlshostel realproperty


    Hello these Quotes related to Oscar Wilde Quotes , hope now you understand it.
     
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