Every twat and their dog will be going on about “the slip”.

sweetnothings

Member
Thai
Steven Gerrard is going to get a lot of grief from opposition supporters this year. Every twat and their dog will be going on about “the slip”. But what is it exactly about Gerrard that has led to fans from all clubs increasingly jumping on the bandwagon normally reserved for the reprobates from across the park, down the East Lancs and off the Kings Road?

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In the above passage, I interpret 'twat' as 'vagina', 'dog' as 'penis' and 'the slip' as 'escape'. I'm not sure if my interpretations are correct. Please help me.
 
  • Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Sweetnothings, when you give us a quote, you need to tell us the source and something about the context.

    That said, even from the three sentences you've quoted, I can see that the topic is football/soccer and a particular error made by the player Steven Gerrard. So no, the words you've highlighlighted don't have the meanings you've suggested.

    It may help you to know that
    (1) there's an expression "every man and his dog" which is simply a colourful way of saying "everyone".
    (2) "twat" is a swear word meaning, here, something like "idiot".
     

    sweetnothings

    Member
    Thai
    Thanks for your valuable suggestions, Loob. I first posted a longer version, but it was deleted on the grounds of being too long. The writer of this article is an expert on football from UK. He wants his writing translated into Thai for publication in Thailand. Unfortunately, I don't know much about football events. I had to google many football terms and events to try to understand his writing. I managed to understand most of it, but I became exhausted and ended up being so confused with the sentence I asked about...lol.
     

    sweetnothings

    Member
    Thai
    Here are the sentences that come after it (I posted longer, but the they got deleted):

    A strange, strange thing occurred in Liverpool’s final pre-season friendly against Borussia Dortmund. As Gerrard approached the Anfield Road End to take the corner that would lead to our second goal of the game, the away fans applauded him. To be frank, that doesn’t normally happen. To be even franker, the opposite usually happens.
     

    Linkway

    Senior Member
    British English
    sweetnothings, Gerrard has been playing in senior football (soccer) for many years and you have not indicated any particular season.

    However, Steven Gerrard is famous for an iconic "slip" in an extremely important match (in the 2013-14 season) during which Gerrard received the ball in clear space but literally "slipped " over (ie fell to the ground). An opposing player then got the ball (due to Gerrard's slip) and proceeded to score a goal, which not only cost Gerrard's team the match, but also caused them to not win the championship.

    So in this case, although it was a "mistake", "the slip" meant that Gerrard literally stumbled.

    This information comes from my football-mad adult grandson and is totally reliable. :)


    You can confirm it by googling for [ steven gerrard "slip" ].


    Although all long-serving players, including Gerrard, must have made "mistakes" at some time, the "slip" that Gerrard is famous for is the above incident where he literally stumbled.
     
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    sound shift

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Post 1 talks about the likelihood of Steven Gerrard getting grief from opposition supporters "this year". That's often football-speak for "this football season". The English football season begins in August, so the "slip" must have occurred before then. Since "Every twat and their dog will be going on about 'the slip'", this "slip" must have been seen by millions. With respect, I don't think it has anything to do with Liverpool's pre-season friendly against Borussia Dortmund (post 4) because pre-season friendlies are of interest to only a few. I think it refers to a moment in Uruguay vs England at the World Cup back in June, when a high ball out of the Uruguayan defence skimmed off Gerrard's head and into the path of Luis "Dracula" Suárez, who promptly scored :)mad: and indeed :().

    Hmmm ... Cross-posted with Linkway, whose whose grandson's explanation may be better than mine, since it deals with a literal slip: Gerrard slipped over. This occurred in Liverpool vs Chelsea towards the end of the 2013-2014 season and led to a goal by the visitors, as I recall. Chelsea went on to win the match, a result that put a big dent in Liverpool's title ambitions. (No emoticons from me here because I don't support Liverpool or Chelsea.)
     
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