Everything _____ (go) well. I feel happy.

brian&me

Senior Member
Chinese - China
Everything _____ (go) well. I feel happy.

The answer key is ‘goes’, but I think ‘has gone’ and ‘is going’ are both OK. What do you say?

Thanks.
 
  • brian&me

    Senior Member
    Chinese - China
    Thanks, Copyright.

    You mean all the three forms are correct. I wonder if there are any differences between ‘gets’, ‘has gotten’ and ‘is getting’.

    They say 'use the suitable verb forms to fill into the blanks'.

    There are two more similar questions.

    1.It _____ (get dark). Let’s go home.

    The answer key is ‘gets dark’. But ‘has gotten dark ’ and ‘is getting dark’ are also OK. Right?

    2. My grandmother is 60 years old. Her hair _____ (get white).

    The answer key is ‘gets white’, while ‘has gotten white’ and ‘is getting white’ are OK too. Right again?

    Thanks a lot.
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    If these two additional questions are on a test, you have a problem.

    It gets dark. Let's go home.
    My grandmother is 60 years old. Her hair gets dark.


    Neither of those is idiomatic or even particularly logical. Your suggestions are.
     

    boozer

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    What an awful test!
    Unless, of course, you are expected to use only one tense, the one you studied recently, and the only purpose is to exercise the correct verb form, e.g. it gets dark, as opposed to it get :cross: dark.
     

    brian&me

    Senior Member
    Chinese - China
    These questions are in an exercise book.

    For this question: Everything _____ (go) well. I feel happy.

    There are no differences between ‘gets’, ‘has gotten’ and ‘is getting’. Am I right?

    Thanks again.
     

    brian&me

    Senior Member
    Chinese - China
    If these two additional questions are on a test, you have a problem.

    It gets dark. Let's go home.
    My grandmother is 60 years old. Her hair gets dark.


    Neither of those is idiomatic or even particularly logical. Your suggestions are.
    Thanks, Copyright.
    Can I say we can only use 'gets' in the following way:
    This plant gets green every year.
    Thanks again.
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    These questions are in an exercise book.

    For this question: Everything _____ (go) well. I feel happy.

    There are no differences between ‘gets’, ‘has gotten’ and ‘is getting’. Am I right?

    Thanks again.
    The words you are suggesting are forms of get. The word in brackets is go. The answer will be a form of 'go'.
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    Can I say we can only use 'gets' in the following way:
    This plant gets green every year.
    I wouldn't say that, preferring "This plant turns green every year." You could even say "This plant goes green every year" (somewhat advanced English). :) But I wouldn't use "gets."
     

    brian&me

    Senior Member
    Chinese - China
    Everything goes well. I feel happy.
    'Goes' here isn't a link verb. Am I right?
    Thanks.
     

    Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    Everything goes well is most often a universal statement (I've no idea what a link verb is). Whenever he is in charge, everything goes well.

    Everything is going well refers to the state of affairs at this moment. It's 12.55 and everything is going well so far.

    Both of these are forms of the verb to go, as are will go well, will have been going well, would have gone well... etc.
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    Everything goes well. I feel happy.
    'Goes' here isn't a link verb. Am I right?
    Thanks.
    I think you are right. "Well" is an adverb here. In "I am keeping well", it is an adjective and "keeping" is a linking verb I think.

    A copular verb is a special kind of verb used to join an adjective or noun complement to a subject.

    The copular verbs like become, get, grow, go, turn, stay, remain, keep etc., are used to talk about change or the absence of change. The leaves are going yellow.
    What are copular verbs?
     

    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    "Everything goes well" is unidiomatic except in generalised contexts (such as Keith mentioned in #11). The only one-word version of "go" that makes sense in a particular context is "went". I am happy because everything went well (e.g. I think I got most of the answers right in my test, or we managed to boil the rice without burning it).
     

    boozer

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    In "I am keeping well", it is an adjective and "keeping" is a linking verb I think.
    Maybe... :confused: I am not disagreeing, but the verb 'keep', compared with 'be', seems to contribute too much to the general meaning to be seen as a mere linking verb. It may well be, though...
     

    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    to be seen as a mere linking verb
    There is nothing "mere" about a linking verb. It's just a usage classification.

    In simple terms, a verb is "linking" whenever it links a subject to an "object" that is the same as the subject (e.g. "Fred is an idiot") or to an adjective describing the subject ("Fred is tired").
    Whether "am keeping" is linking or not depends on whether "well" is an adjective modifying "I" (we can also say "I am well"), or whether it is an adverb modifying "keeping". The latter seems unlikely, as it would mean that I am very good at keeping. But at keeping what? Goats? Chickens? No, my health, and my ability to keep the wolf from the door! "I am keeping well" means "I am doing all right".
     

    brian&me

    Senior Member
    Chinese - China
    These questions are in an exercise book.

    For this question: Everything _____ (go) well. I feel happy.

    There are no differences between ‘gets’, ‘has gotten’ and ‘is getting’. Am I right?

    Thanks again.
    I‘m sorry I made a mistake. I meant to ask if there are any differences between 'goes', 'has gone' and 'is going' for the question: Everything _____ (go) well. I feel happy.
    Thanks a lot.
     

    brian&me

    Senior Member
    Chinese - China
    For the question ‘Everything _____ (go) well. I feel happy’, which is not required to fill in with one word. Somebody says ‘goes’ is OK. Somebody says 'goes', 'has gone' and 'is going' are all OK. And somebody says only ‘went’ is OK. I’m much confused. But I have an idea that ‘is going’ is the best answer. What do you say?

    Thanks a lot.
     

    Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    We don't have the test paper in front of us. What does it say? Does it say "fill the gap with one word" or does it say "fill the gap with a form of the verb"?
    • If you are only allowed one word, then "went" is the best (perhaps the only real) possibility.
    • But if you can choose any verb-form, then there are perfectly correct one-word, two-word, three-word and even four-word answers (see my #11).
    Yet another example of badly-phrased exam questions!
     

    brian&me

    Senior Member
    Chinese - China
    We don't have the test paper in front of us. What does it say? Does it say "fill the gap with one word" or does it say "fill the gap with a form of the verb"?
    • If you are only allowed one word, then "went" is the best (perhaps the only real) possibility.
    • But if you can choose any verb-form, then there are perfectly correct one-word, two-word, three-word and even four-word answers (see my #11).
    Yet another example of badly-phrased exam questions!
    Thanks, Keith.

    I mentioned in# 3:They say 'use the suitable verb forms to fill into the blanks'.

    Sorry I didn’t pointed that out in my original post. I will pay attention to that next time.

    If so, do you mean that all the four forms (went, goes, has gone and is going) are OK?

    Thank you very much for you patience and help.
     

    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    Well, if the test question literally said "Use the suitable verb forms", then that is already an indication that the test was created by someone with a poor grasp of English.
    Are you sure it didn't say "the most suitable"? I'll bet it didn't provide any context against which you could asses the suitability of various verb forms.
    This is important because "does" is not suitable except in specific contexts (identified in #11 and #15). It is not what we would say in conversation.
    In conversation, "went", "has gone", and "is going" are all OK, depending, obviously, on whether the "going well" has finished or is continuing.
     
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