Everything has its price.

perpend

Banned
American English
<< Moderator's note: this thread has been broken off form an earlier discussion found here:
something you have to pay to get done / spend money to ....
>>
Can one say:

a. This is something you have to pay to get done.
b. This is something you have to spend money to get done.


I think they both work fine. The to speaker wants to say that nobody would do a specifc task for free as a favor and that the addressee has to spend money get that task carried out.

Many Thanks.
Azz.
<< --->>

You could also say: Everything has its price.
 
Last edited by a moderator:
  • perpend

    Banned
    American English
    Again:
    Everything has its price.

    Or, if you will:
    Everything has a price.

    They don't fit?
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    They don't fit for me, perpend. "Everything has its price" doesn't mean "This is something which has to be paid for".
     

    azz

    Senior Member
    armenian
    Interesting turn of events. I have to thank all those who participated.

    I think when we say "nobody would do a specifc task for free" we do not mean that "nobody would do anything for free". Some things might be done for free. I think maybe the problem is the word specific. To me "a specific task" means one particular task. If I had written "a task", I suppose the sentence would have been vague.

    I would like to see what you guys think about this.

    Many thanks.
     

    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    If someone were to tell me "this is something you have to pay to get done", I would take it to mean this is not a do-it-yourself job but that I'd need to get a skilled professional in. It would not (for me) necessarily carry the meaning that I could not get a friend to do it "for free". After all, I might happen to have a friend who has the necessary skills, and who would be happy to do the job as a favour. Granted, it might not be totally "free", because one generally "returns" favours.

    "Everything has its price" to me means something completely different. If I have no friend of whom I could ask the aforementioned favour, I would invite two or three professionals to quote me a price for carrying out the work. I might then be shocked at the high prices they all quoted, because I might not have thought it could be that expensive. I might then complain about these high prices to a friend, and the friend might then say "everything has its price", which I'd take to mean "it costs what it costs", or "that's how much this type of work costs these days".
     

    Beryl from Northallerton

    Senior Member
    British English
    As far as I'm concerned, your passage establishing context (the bit we don't normally correct) should have read like this:

    The to speaker wants to say that nobody would do a this specific task for free as a favor and that the addressee has will have to spend money get that task carried out.

    There is redundancy in it, but saying things twice isn't always such a bad idea.
     
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